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Best Obesity Blogs of 2015

obesity-best 2015I am honestly delighted to see that Dr Sharma’s Obesity Notes are in good company among the recently announced best obesity blogs curated for 2015 by Healthline.

Here is the list of other blogs – they’re all worth checking out:

Obesity Panacea by PhD bloggers Travis Saunders and Peter Janiszewski (both CON bootcampers), covers topics such as fat bullying and the dangers of being sedentary. 

It’s Not About Nutrition by Sociologist and feeding expert Dr. Dina Rose teaches parents how to help their kids make good food choices. She suggests ways to make tasting new foods fun and mealtime a little easier for everyone.

Weighty Matters by Yoni Freedhoff, a Canadian professor and evidence-based nutrition expert (and good friend and colleague), tackles the big issues in a way that makes you feel like you’re talking with a friend.

Fooducate reveals the ways in which food companies try to “hook” people into buying their products. It also writes about the health risks associated with various ingredients and has the research to back up the claims.

Food Politics by Marion Nestle, is dedicated to tracking the relationship between obesity and the government’s regulations on food. 

The OAC blog from the Obesity Action Coalition, as a one-stop shopping depot for information about obesity with topics ranging from how to have a conversation with your child about being overweight to information about bariatric surgery or joining a gym.

Daily Strength gives you the latest on obesity and healthy eating in an easy-to-read list format. Each post is color-coded to help you find exactly what you’re looking for.

Hello Healthy is MyFitnessPal’s blog with fitness tips, Q&As with staff members, and inspirational stories about real people losing weight.

Obesity Timebomb by  “fat activist” and psychotherapist Dr. Charlotte Cooper, looks at fat performance, fat culture, and obesity research from a human perspective.

300 Pounds Down, chronicles the progress of a mother who once weighed 417 pounds and opted for bariatric surgery.

Escape from Obesity is a deeply personal blog about one woman’s weight loss journey sharing her innermost thoughts about losing weight.

The World According to Eggface by Shelly, who had gastric bypass surgery in 2006., share ways to cram delicious nutrition into smaller packages. You’ll enjoy reading and could very well win one of her regular giveaways.

Childhood Obesity News seeks to inform professionals like doctors, educators, and counselors. It’s also a great site for parents. The kids get a say, too, in a series of profiles about how they feel about their bodies. 

Fit to the Finish by spices Diane Carbonell, who lost 158 lbs almost 20 years ago shares  news on wellness and eating habits with some of her recipes. 

Congratulations to all concerned!

@DrSharma
Berlin, Germany

 

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Rethinking Healthy Eating And Obesity

OPHANRCThis morning, I am presenting a talk at a workshop hosted by the Ontario Public Health Association’s Nutrition Resource Centre here at the 4th Canadian Obesity Summit in Toronto.

As the organisers of the symposium point out,

Messages from the media, industry, and even some health professionals and public health campaigns often convey the idea that obesity can be prevented by simply eating less, eating better, and moving more. This reinforces the idea that obesity is a matter of lifestyle choices and personal responsibility. However, is obesity prevention really that simple? What about the role of the food environment and social determinants of health? Are current messages about obesity actually effective? Is it as easy as “eat less, eat better”?”

This one-day forum, brings together Canadian health promotion and nutrition professionals to explore the answers to these timely questions.  Through (hopefully) thought-provoking presentations and engagement with leading experts, participants will be challenged to critically rethink conventional approaches to healthy eating and obesity messaging.

Indeed, the fact that many working in public health and obesity prevention are revisiting the often-heard messaging about simply eating less and moving more as a means of achieving a “healthy” weight, is a big step forward in perhaps coming closer to finding an effective communication and messaging strategy about obesity that does not inadvertently promote simplistic notions about obesity that do little else than reinforce and propagate weight bias.

I congratulate the OPHA’s Nutrition Resource Centre for taking on this challenge and opening, what I am sure will be a most fruitful dialogue, that will eventually change both the perception of what obesity actually is and lead to solutions that both incorporate our latest understanding of this complex chronic disease and do so without unintended harm to those living with this condition.

@DrSharma
Toronto, ON

 

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Plan Your Personalized Program For The Canadian Obesity Summit Now

Summit15appIf you are planning to attend the 4th Canadian Obesity Summit in Toronto next week (and anyone else, who is interested), you can now download the program app on your mobile, tablet, laptop, desktop, eReader, or anywhere else – the app works on all major platforms and operating systems, even works offline.

You can access and download the app here.

(To watch a brief video on how to install this app on your device click here)

You can then create an individual profile (including photo) and a personalised day-by-day schedule.

Obviously, you can also search by speakers, topics, categories, and other criteria.

Hoping to see you at the Summit next week – have a great weekend!

@DrSharma
Gurgaon, Haryana

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Workshop: Obesity in young people with physical disabilities

special needs kidsThe prevalence of overweight and obesity in children with physical disabilities (CWPD) is 2-3 times that of their non-disabled peers, threatening the increased life expectancy made possible by other medical advances.

Many clinicians report substantial challenges in assessing, discussing and managing the weight of CWPD and there appears to be a tension between a desire to address weight-management, attending to children’s other (sometimes considerable) medical and psychosocial needs, and fear of causing harm.

This is the topic of a half-day workshop on Wednesday, April 29th, 2015, at the Canadian Obesity Summit, which will provide an overview of current research on the identification, management and prevention of obesity in CWPD.

The impact of obesity on service utilization and outcomes will be examined, as well as key weight-related issues faced by clinicians working with CWPD.

Research detailing the self-identified needs of children and their parents will be presented, grounding the workshop in the patient voice. The presenters and their research teams represent leading multi-disciplinary researchers, who are also members of a newly formed network of Canadian researchers working in health promotion and childhood disability.

This network is one outcome of a CIHR- funded, international consensus-building workshop, aiming to build knowledge-generating capacity within Canada around weight-related issues for CWPD.

This workshop therefore offers a critical opportunity to share knowledge, raise awareness and build capacity in this vastly under-researched area.

For more information on this workshop at the Canadian Obesity Summit click here

@DrSharma
Gurgaon, Haryana

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What Happens To Patients With Severe Obesity In Hospitals?

bariatric patient in bedWith the increasing number of Canadians living with severe obesity (BMIs 50+), it is not unexpected that more of them will be seen in healthcare settings.

However, whether or not Canadian hospitals are ready to look after these patients with in the right setting with the right equipment and whether healthcare providers are aware of and sensitive to the special needs of these patients is not clear.

This is why, Mary Forhan and her team at the University of Alberta is currently conducting a qualitative and quantitative assessment of exactly what problems patients with severe obesity face in healthcare settings.

The study, funded by Alberta Innovates Health Solution (AIHS) will look at the special challenges that these patients present in a range for settings – acute care, cancer, cardiology and rehabilitation.

A substudy will also examine the issues faced by kids and adolescent with severe obesity in healthcare settings.

Together, this project should lead to a better understanding on how healthcare systems better prepare themselves to deliver compassionate and professional care to adults and children living with severe obesity in Alberta. The learnings will likely also inform healthcare systems elsewhere.

For more on this study visit the AIHS website.

If you are someone living with severe obesity, who has experienced issues in your healthcare that could have been prevented or addressed with appropriate equipment and/or training, I’d love to hear your story.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

Conflict: I am a co-investigator on this project.

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