Friday, August 1, 2014

The 5As of Healthy Pregnancy Weight Gain

5AsPregnancy_PractitionerGuide_rf-final_Page_01Yesterday, the Canadian Obesity Network released the 5As of Healthy Pregnancy Weight Gain.

This follows the release of the 5As of Obesity Management (adults) and the 5As of Pediatric Weight Management.

The 5As of Health Pregnancy Weight Gain, was developed by a working group of nurses, midwives, primary care physicians, obstetricians, researchers and policy makers convened by the Network.

It is based on the best available evidence on this topic and is intended to help primary care practitioners discuss and manage gestational weight with their patients.

The 5As of Healthy Pregnancy Weight Gain is based on the following 5 key principles:

  • Discussion about gestational weight gain should occur with every pregnant women and with every woman planning a pregnancy.

  • Achieving healthy gestational weight gain is about improving the health and well-being of both mothers and babies.

  • Early action means addressing root causes and removing roadblocks.

  • Pregnancy related health beliefs can be powerful influences on weight gain in pregnancy.

  • Achieving goals is different for every woman.

The 5As of Health Pregnancy Weight Gain can be downloaded here – pdfppt

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

p.s. if you did not receive the Obesity Network Newsletter with this announcement due to Canada’s new anti-spam legislation, please click here.

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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

5th Conference on Childhood and Adolescent Obesity, Winnipeg, Sept 23-26, 2014

Jonathan McGavock, PhD, Assoc. Professor, Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, MB

Jonathan McGavock, PhD, Assoc. Professor, Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, MB

For readers interested in the prevention and management of childhood and adolescent obesity, there is still time to submit your abstract (deadline Aug 5) and to register for this event in Winnipeg.

Those of you, who have been to previous meetings in this series, will know that this meeting (interspersed biennially with the Canadian Obesity Summit) brings together clinicians, researchers, policy makers and other stakeholders for 4 days of intense networking and knowledge exchange.

This year’s conference is being organised by Jon McGavock from the Manitoba Institute of Child Health and is sure to be a blast.

Given Jon’s interest in this area, this year’s conference will include a strong focus on the burden of obesity among Indigenous Youth and showcase examples of the best and promising practices within Indigenous communities across Canada and the US.

This special theme will include presentations from Indigenous youth living in communities with a high burden of obesity, sharing circles with Indigenous leaders and stakeholders and will explore interventions designed to promote these strengths and enhance resiliency among children and adolescents.

Of course, the conference will also cover a wide range of other topics related to childhood obesity across the age and care continuum.

View CE Credits HERE.

Brochure is available HERE.

Register for the conference HERE.

Registration for the pre-conference only HERE.

Submit your abstract HERE.

Incidentally, I will be having the privilege of giving a keynote at the opening of the pre-conference.

While in Winnipeg, I will also be performing my “Stop Being a Yo-Yo” show at the Colin Jackson Studio Theatre on Sept. 24, Show time: 7:00 p.m. (click HERE for online tickets).

See you in Winnipeg!

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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Wednesday, July 23, 2014

In Memorium: Albert (Mickey) J Stunkard

Stunkard twinsAs I spend my days at the 9th Canadian Obesity Network’s Summer Bootcamp for young trainees from Canada and around the world, I was saddened to learn of the passing of Mickey Stunkard, clearly one of the biggest names in obesity research – at a healthy age of 92.

With well over 500 publications to his name, Mickey is perhaps best known for his twin studies showing that the body weight of adopted identical twins reared apart resembles each other and that of their biological parents rather than the weight of their adoptive parents.

This work helped establish the basis for much of the genetic work on obesity that followed, clearly showing that differences in body weight between two individuals are much more accounted for by their difference in genetics than by differences in their “lifestyles”.

These findings were often misused in “nature vs. nurture” debates, an issue that serious scientists have long laid to rest in light of our current understanding that the two cannot be discussed separately, simply because genes and lifestyle interact on virtually every level – from molecules, to cells, to behaviours.

Here is what one obituary had to say about Mickey:

“He surveyed obesity treatment studies in the late ’50s and found that the nation’s diet programs could claim only a 2 percent success rate. He was an early advocate for the use of bariatric surgery to induce weight loss. He also published the first modern account of binge eating in obese individuals.”

I have had to pleasure to often hear him speak at conferences.

He will be dearly remembered.

@DrSharma
Kananaskis, AB

 

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Tuesday, July 22, 2014

9th Annual Canadian Obesity Network Obesity Research Bootcamp

CON Bootcamp 2014As regular readers will be well aware, each year I attend the Canadian Obesity Network’s Obesity Research Bootcamp, an intense 10-day course for hand-picked young obesity researchers from Canada and around the world.

This year the trainees from Canada (13), Germany (8), Argentina (3), Chile (1), Malaysia (2), Peru (1), Spain (1), USA (1) come from a wide range of research areas – from molecular genetics to health psychology.

Following the opening address by Philip Sherman, Director of the Canadian Institutes of Heath Institute for Nutrition, Metabolism and Diabetes (CIHR-INMD), the course began yesterday with small-group learning sessions on defining and measuring obesity (Ian Jannsen, Queen’s University), weight bias and discrimination (Mary Forhan, University of Alberta), mental health issues (Valerie Taylor, University of Toronto), and energy balance (Eric Ducet, University of Ottawa).

These were complemented by presentations from the trainees on their own work and journal-club style discussion of key papers on relevant issues.

Not least, the camp also encourages networking and discussions that push the trainees to remarkably broaden their perspective on obesity.

I certainly look forward to an intense week at bootcamp.

@DrSharma
Kananaskis, AB

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Thursday, June 26, 2014

Guidelines for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults

the obesity societyRegular readers may recall a previous post on guidelines on obesity management released by The Obesity Society (TOS) together with other organisations, including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, at Obesity Week in Atlanta last year (2013).

The bottom line, as I have blogged before, was the revelation of just how little we actually know about obesity.

For what it is worth, the complete guidelines are now published as a supplement to its July issue of the Obesity journal (Guidelines (2013) for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults: Full Report).

According to The Obesity Society’s press release,

TOS is investing in the improved treatment of obesity by making the full guidelines available in print so they can serve as a go-to resource for health practitioners around the world. Whether you are a physician, nurse, nutritionist or fitness trainer, every professional interacting with individuals with obesity can find value in this insightful treatment guide.

No doubt, a tremendous amount of work went into developing these guidelines – whether they will substantially change practice remains to be seen.

@DrSharma
Vancouver, BC

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In The News

Diabetics in most need of bariatric surgery, university study finds

Oct. 18, 2013 – Ottawa Citizen: "Encouraging more men to consider bariatric surgery is also important, since it's the best treatment and can stop diabetic patients from needing insulin, said Dr. Arya Sharma, chair in obesity research and management at the University of Alberta." Read article

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