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My Miniseries on Obesity As a Disease



NN Benefits White Paper CoverOver the past weeks, I have presented a miniseries on the pros and cons of calling obesity a chronic disease.

Clearly, I am convinced that the arguments in favour, carry far greater chances of effectively preventing and controlling obesity (defined as abnormal or excess body fat that impairs health) than continuing to describe obesity merely as a matter of ‘lifestyle’ or simply a ‘risk factor’ for other diseases.

That said, I would like to acknowledge that the term ‘disease’ is a societal construct (there is, to my knowledge no binding legal or widely accepted scientific definition of what exactly warrants the term ‘disease’).

As all societal constructs are subject to change, our definitions of disease are subject to change. Conditions that may once have been deemed a ‘normal’ feature of aging (e.g. type 2 diabetes or dementia) have long risen to the status of ‘diseases’.  This recognition has had profound impact on everything from human rights legislations to health insurance to the emphasis given to these conditions in medical education and practice.

People living with obesity deserve no less.

Thus, I come down heavily on the ‘utilitarian’ principle of calling obesity a disease.

When, calling obesity a ‘disease’ best serves the interests of those affected by the condition, then, by all means, call obesity a ‘disease’ – it is as simple as that.

First consequences of the American Medical Association declaring obesity a chronic disease are already evident (see here and here).

We can only hope for the same impact of the Canadian Medical Association declaring obesity a disease – the sooner, the better for all Canadians living with obesity.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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