Friday, July 18, 2014

Birth Control And Obesity

sharma-obesity-birth-control-pillAlthough obesity is a well-recognised factor for female infertility, the vast majority of women with excess weight are probably more interested in effective birth control.

That this is not as simple as it seems is evident from an article by Sheila Mody and Michelle Han from the University of California, San Diego, published in Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecaology.

The paper succinctly reviews a wide range of issues related to birth control and obesity.

To begin with, the authors points out that unintended pregnancies in obese women are often a problem simply because obese women are far less likely to use effective contraception than non-obese women. This non-use may in part be attributable to fear of weight gain, when most studies show that modern hormonal contraception is associated with almost no weight gain. The exception appears to be depot-medroxyprogesterone (DMPA), which may cause about 5 lb weight gain in the first year of use.

As for efficacy, the data show that unintended pregnancy rates among overweight women using oral contraceptives are similar or slightly higher than that among nonoverweight women. The reasons for these higher rates are not exactly clear.

Fortunately, the efficacy of intrauterine devices (IUD) appear no different between obese and non-obese women although the insertion of an IUD maybe more difficult in obese women because of poor visualization of the cervix and limited assessment of uterine position (a problem that can often be solved with the help of an ultrasound).

The paper also discusses the suitability of the vaginal vaginal contraceptive ring, which has been hypothesized to offer higher hormone levels for obese women than oral contraceptives because the hormones are absorbed directly into the vaginal mucosa and do not go through the first- pass liver metabolism.

Finally, the paper discusses issues around contraception for women who have undergone bariatric surgery (who have a particularly high rate of unintended pregnancies) as well as best practices for emergency contraception.

This is clearly information that all clinicians who counsel obese women should be aware of.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgMody SK, & Han M (2014). Obesity and Contraception. Clinical obstetrics and gynecology PMID: 25029338

 

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Tuesday, July 15, 2014

The Molecular Biology of Food And Mood

sharma-obesity-brainThe neuroendocrine systems that control ingestive behaviour are intimately linked to the parts of the brain that control mood.

Thus, it is increasingly evident that factors that affect energy homeostasis (diet and exercise) can have profound effects on mood while changes in mood can have significant effects on appetite and energy homeostasis.

But this relationship is far from straightforward – rather, it appears to be rather complex.

Readers interested in an overview of how these two systems interact in the brain may find a recent review by Chen Liu from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, published in Cell Metabolism of interest.

The authors review our current understanding of how mood and food are linked with particular attention to appetite, ingestive behaviour and energy homeostasis.

The article also touches on the effects of pharmacological and surgical treatments for obesity on mood.

Clearly clinicians need to be aware of the close links between these systems and draw on our current understanding of both in their counselling of patients presenting with weight gain and/or depression.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgLiu C, Lee S, & Elmquist JK (2014). Circuits Controlling Energy Balance and Mood: Inherently Intertwined or Just Complicated Intersections? Cell metabolism, 19 (6), 902-909 PMID: 24630814

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Monday, July 14, 2014

How To Prevent Gallstones During Weight Loss

GallstonesOne of the best recognised complications of weight loss – especially if this occurs too rapidly – are the development of gallstones, which can result in acute symptoms and often require surgery.

Now Caroline Stokes and colleagues from the Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg, Germany, publish a systematic review of strategies to prevent weight-loss associate gallbladder stones in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Their analysis includes 13 randomised-controlled trials, comprising 1836 participants undergoing weight loss through dieting (8 trials) or bariatric surgery (5 trials).

Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) reduced the risk of ultrasound-verified gallstones compared with control interventions with a risk ratio of 0.33 and a number-needed-to-treat (NNT) of only 9.

They also found a significant risk reduction with high-fat weight loss diets (risk ration 0.09).

No adverse effects were noted for either intervention.

Thus, it is evident that UDCA and/or higher dietary fat content prevent the formation of gallstones during weight loss and these treatments should likely be initiated particularly in patients, who are undergoing rapid weight loss (particularly those at high risk of gallbladder stones).

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgStokes CS, Gluud LL, Casper M, & Lammert F (2014). Ursodeoxycholic Acid and Diets Higher in Fat Prevent Gallbladder Stones During Weight Loss: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, 12 (7), 1090-110000 PMID: 24321208

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Thursday, June 26, 2014

Guidelines for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults

the obesity societyRegular readers may recall a previous post on guidelines on obesity management released by The Obesity Society (TOS) together with other organisations, including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, at Obesity Week in Atlanta last year (2013).

The bottom line, as I have blogged before, was the revelation of just how little we actually know about obesity.

For what it is worth, the complete guidelines are now published as a supplement to its July issue of the Obesity journal (Guidelines (2013) for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults: Full Report).

According to The Obesity Society’s press release,

TOS is investing in the improved treatment of obesity by making the full guidelines available in print so they can serve as a go-to resource for health practitioners around the world. Whether you are a physician, nurse, nutritionist or fitness trainer, every professional interacting with individuals with obesity can find value in this insightful treatment guide.

No doubt, a tremendous amount of work went into developing these guidelines – whether they will substantially change practice remains to be seen.

@DrSharma
Vancouver, BC

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Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Time To Go Nuts About Nuts?

sharma-obesity-nutsNuts are reportedly chock full of all kinds of nutrients and are probably among the healthiest of snacks. However, they are also among the most calorie-dense foods – a small handful of nuts (~30 g) can easily add up to 150-200 cals.

So, do high consumers of nuts run the risk of weight gain?

This issue is discussed in depth by Sze Yen Tan and colleagues in a paper published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, in which they review the effects of nuts on appetite, food intake, metabolism, and body weight.

While eating nuts may not exactly lead to weight loss, most studies find that consumption of “extra” calories as nuts leads to substantially less weight gain than may be expected based on their caloric content.

Their review reflect a number of ways in which nuts may have this effect:

Effect on hunger and appetite:

“…nut ingestion suppresses hunger and desire to eat and promotes fullness. These sensations may aid dietary compensation that offsets much of the energy contributed by nuts. However, strong compensation can also occur independently of reported appetitive effects. This may reflect imprecision in appetite measurement or a truly independent uncharacterized mechanism.”

Mastication (chewing):

“Nuts require considerable oral processing effort and this may, in part, account for the often-noted less-than-predicted effect of their consumption on body weight. The mechanical act of chewing reportedly generates satiation signals through cognitive, neural, endocrine, and physical (eg, gastric emptying) mechanisms; augments cephalic phase responses linked to appetite; influences digestion efficiency; modestly increases energy expenditure; and elicits dietary compensation.”

Nutrient absorption:

“A number of studies have evaluated the efficiency of energy absorption from ground and tree nuts through feeding trials. All showed substantive increases in fecal fat loss with nut consumption, although the values ranged widely from ∼5% to >20%”

Energy expenditure:

“Collectively, there is some evidence that nut consumption increases thermogenesis, but the data are not robust and there is no clear mechanism. One possibility is that the lipid from nuts is absorbed over a prolonged period of time, leading to a small but sustained source of substrate that fuels thermogenesis and could appear as an increase in REE.”

Fat metabolism:

“It has been proposed that nut consumption elevates fat oxidation and preferentially reduces body fat mass, especially in the viscera. These actions are attributed to their high unsaturated fat content….Human studies incorporating different nuts into the diet at realistic doses are needed to determine the effect of nut consumption on body composition.”

With regard to impact on body weight, the authors reach the following conclusions:

Adding nuts to habitual diets:

“Although there are reports of small, but significant increases in body weight with nut consumption, the preponderance of evidence indicates that under controlled or free-living situations, nut consumption does not promote weight gain.”

Eating nuts in calorie-restricted diets:

“The inclusion of nuts in energy-restriction regimens does not impede weight loss. In several trials in which nuts did not augment weight loss, there was a reduction in cardiovascular disease risk indexes in the nut-consuming groups, suggesting that such benefits derive from properties of the nuts rather than just weight change.”

Eating nuts in weight maintenance:

“Several studies assessing the role of nut consumption in weight-maintenance programs have noted a decrease in body weight from baseline. Whether this is due to a greater thermic effect of food or REE effect of the nuts compared with the foods they displaced in the diet has not been established. Nevertheless, current data indicate that the inclusion of nuts in a weight-maintenance program will not lead to weight gain and may aid weight loss.”

Thus, in summary, the authors conclude that,

“…evidence indicates that they pose little challenge to and may even aid weight management. This is attributable to the strong dietary compensation effects they elicit, inefficiency in the absorption of the energy they provide, and possibly an elevation of energy expenditure and fat oxidation.”

As a general caveat to all of these data, it needs to be noted that results varied widely depending on the types of nuts and how exactly these nuts were consumed (e.g. as snacks or added to meals – the former often being more favourable than the latter).

Also, many of the studies had relatively small number of participants and were of rather short duration.

Nevertheless, it does appear that going nuts about nuts may not be quite as detrimental to your weight as their energy content would suggest.

@DrSharma
Toronto, ON

ResearchBlogging.orgTan SY, Dhillon J, & Mattes RD (2014). A review of the effects of nuts on appetite, food intake, metabolism, and body weight. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 100 (Supplement 1) PMID: 24920033

 

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In The News

Diabetics in most need of bariatric surgery, university study finds

Oct. 18, 2013 – Ottawa Citizen: "Encouraging more men to consider bariatric surgery is also important, since it's the best treatment and can stop diabetic patients from needing insulin, said Dr. Arya Sharma, chair in obesity research and management at the University of Alberta." Read article

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