Thursday, September 18, 2014

Efficacy of Vagal Blockade For Obesity Treatment Remains Vague

VBLOC

VBLOC

Regular readers may recall past posts on the use of intermittent electrical blockade of the vagus nerves (VBLOC) as a means of reducing food intake to promote weight loss.

Now a large randomised controlled study of vagal blocakade, published by Sayeed Ikramuddin and colleagues, published in JAMA, reports on rather disappointing outcomes with this treatment.

In this study (ReCharge), conducted  at one of 10 sites in the United States and Australia between May and December 2011, 239 participants with a BMI greater than 40 (or greater than 35 with at least one comorbidity), were randomised to receiving an active vagal nerve block device (EnteroMedics’ Maestro® Rechargeable (RC) System, n=162) or a sham device (n=77).

Over the 12-month blinded portion of the 5-year study (completed in January 2013), the vagal nerve block group lost about 9% or their initial body weight compared to only 6% in the sham group.

In addition to this rather modest difference in weight loss between the groups (about 3%), participants in the active treatment group also experienced a number of clinically relevant adverse effects (heartburn or dyspepsia and abdominal pain).

Thus, overall these rather disappointing results are in line with the previously disappointing observations in the smaller MAESTRO trial.

Based on these findings, it seems that intermittent electrical blockade of the vagal nerve may not hold its promise of a safe and effective long-term treatment for severe obesity after all.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgIkramuddin S, Blackstone RP, Brancatisano A, Toouli J, Shah SN, Wolfe BM, Fujioka K, Maher JW, Swain J, Que FG, Morton JM, Leslie DB, Brancatisano R, Kow L, O’Rourke RW, Deveney C, Takata M, Miller CJ, Knudson MB, Tweden KS, Shikora SA, Sarr MG, & Billington CJ (2014). Effect of reversible intermittent intra-abdominal vagal nerve blockade on morbid obesity: the ReCharge randomized clinical trial. JAMA, 312 (9), 915-22 PMID: 25182100

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Monday, September 15, 2014

Update on New Medications for Obesity

sharma-obesity-fda4Last week, while I was off on a brief holiday, two important events took place in the US with regard to obesity medications.

On September 10, the US-FDA granted approval for Contrave, a fixed combination of bupropion and naltrexone, two centrally active compounds, also used in the treatment of addictions.

Then, on September 11, an advisory panel appointed by the FDA, voted strongly in favour of approving the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide at the 3.mg dose for the treatment of obesity.

These two new entities would bring the currently approved prescription medications for the treatment of obesity in the US to six – a dramatic change from just a couple of years ago.

This is still a long shot away from the many effective treatments we have for treating other common conditions (e.g. there are more than 20 prescription medications approved for treating diabetes and almost 100 compounds for the treatment of hypertension).

Why would we need this many different medications for obesity? For the simple reason that not everyone will respond favourably or tolerate all of these compounds.

Given that obesity is a remarkably heterogeneous disorder and that these drugs have distinctly different modes of action, I would not expect all of these medications to work in all individuals.

It is also important to note that all of these drugs work best when combined with intense behaviour modification – no pill will ever serve as a substitute for a healthy diet and a daily dose of moderate to vigorous physical activity. But we also know that the latter alone, will rarely produce sustainable weight loss in the long-term.

Obviously, given the chronic nature of obesity, medications for obesity will need to be used long-term in the same manner that we use medications to treat other chronic conditions (e.g. diabetes, hypertension, etc.).

This means that we will need more long-term data on the efficacy and safety of these compounds.

Nevertheless, there is reason to hope that for many people with obesity related health problems, these new obesity medications will provide much-needed therapeutic options.

@DrSharma
Vienna, Austria

Disclaimer: I have served as a paid consultant and/or speaker for the makers of Contrave and liraglutide.

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Friday, August 29, 2014

2014 Scopinaro Lecture

Nicola Scopinaro, MD, Professor of Surgery, University of Genoa Medical School, Italy

Nicola Scopinaro, MD, Professor of Surgery, University of Genoa Medical School, Italy

This morning, at the XIX World Congress of the International Federation of Surgery for Obesity and Metabolic Disorders (IFSO2014), I have the great honour of presenting the 2014 Scopinaro Lecture.

This lecture is named after Nicola Scopinaro, who in 1976 performed the first biliopancreatic diversion for the treatment of obesity.

The Scopinaro Lecture is the highest recognition for a non-surgeon to be awarded by IFSO.

In thinking about what to present, I settled on discussing the topic of whether or not obesity is a disease. Looking back over the work that I have done over the past 25 years, I came to realise that the issue of why some people with excess weight develop health problems and others don’t, has indeed fascinated me for a long time.

Initially, this interest was focussed on trying to understand why some people with obesity develop high blood pressure and others don’t. We were indeed able to show that part of this may be explained by differences in the expression of hormones involved in blood pressure regulation from fat tissue.

More recently, as many regular readers are well aware, I have broadened this interest in describing the limitations of BMI and advocating for a clinical staging system that classifies overweight and obese individuals based on how “sick” they are rather than how “big” they are.

Clearly, this work is of considerable interest to those involved in bariatric care (including bariatric surgeons), as it provides a framework for better prioritizing and assessing risk/benefit ratios than BMI or other anthropometric measures alone.

As I point out in my talk,

- The etiology of obesity is complex and multifactorial.

- The physiology of energy regulation is complex and subverts volitional attempts at weight loss.

- Access to obesity prevention and treatments must be driven by the recognised medical needs to address this condition.

- Multidisciplinary management of this life-long disorder requires resources similar to those required for other chronic diseases

In receiving this honour, I am fully aware that all of my work stands on the shoulders of the many researchers and clinicians who came before me and the considerable support and help that I have been fortunate enough to receive from my many students, trainees, colleagues and supervisors.

This award will certainly serve an a strong incentive to continue my work and advocacy for better treatments for obesity and the advancement of bariatric care.

@DrSharma
Montreal, QC

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Thursday, August 28, 2014

Call For Abstracts: Canadian Obesity Summit, Toronto, April 28-May 2, 2015

COS2015 toronto callBuilding on the resounding success of Kananaskis, Montreal and Vancouver, the biennial Canadian Obesity Summit is now setting its sights on Toronto.

If you have a professional interest in obesity, it’s your #1 destination for learning, sharing and networking with experts from across Canada around the world.

In 2015, the Canadian Obesity Network (CON-RCO) and the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons (CABPS) are combining resources to hold their scientific meetings under one roof.

The 4th Canadian Obesity Summit (#COS2015) will provide the latest information on obesity research, prevention and management to scientists, health care practitioners, policy makers, partner organizations and industry stakeholders working to reduce the social, mental and physical burden of obesity on Canadians.

The COS 2015 program will include plenary presentations, original scientific oral and poster presentations, interactive workshops and a large exhibit hall. Most importantly, COS 2015 will provide ample opportunity for networking and knowledge exchange for anyone with a professional interest in this field.

Abstract submission is now open – click here

Key Dates

  • Abstract submission deadline: October 23, 2014
  • Notification of abstract review: January 8, 2014
  • Early registration deadline: March 5, 2015

For exhibitor and sponsorship information – click here

To join the Canadian Obesity Network – click here

I look forward to seeing you in Toronto next year!

@DrSharma
Montreal, QC

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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

XIX World Congress on Obesity Surgery, Montreal

ifso14 logoFor the rest of this week I will be reporting from the XIX World Congress of the International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders (IFSO) here in Montreal, Canada.

Although I am not a surgeon, staying up to date on all aspects of bariatric surgery is essential for anyone working in the field of bariatric care – and advances there are.

But I am not just here to listen. This morning, together with my colleague Sean Wharton, I will be presenting a 4 hour masters course on obesity management for allied health professionals and later today, I will be presenting a talk on the use of the Edmonton Obesity Staging System as a better way to determine the risk and prognosis of bariatric patients.

I certainly look forward to an intense week of learning and networking in this wonderful city.

@DrSharma
Montreal, QC

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In The News

Diabetics in most need of bariatric surgery, university study finds

Oct. 18, 2013 – Ottawa Citizen: "Encouraging more men to consider bariatric surgery is also important, since it's the best treatment and can stop diabetic patients from needing insulin, said Dr. Arya Sharma, chair in obesity research and management at the University of Alberta." Read article

» More news articles...

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