Friday, December 12, 2014

Prevalence and Treatment of Depression In Canada

sharma-obesity-mental-health1Depression can be a significant factor both in the development of obesity and as an important barrier to its treatment.

Now a paper by Sabrina Wong and colleagues from the University of British Columbia, in a paper published in CMAJ open, present data on the prevalence and treatment of depression in Canadian primary care practices.

The authors analysed electronic medical record data from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network, of over 300,000 patients who had at least one encounter with their primary care provider between Jan. 1, 2011, and Dec. 31, 2012.

Of these, 14% had a diagnosis of depression.

Women with a BMI greater than 30 were about 20% more likely to also have depression than women with a BMI below 25. No such relationship was noted in men.

Overall, 25% of individuals with a diagnosis of depression also had at least one other chronic condition as well as about 50% more doctor visits than individuals without depression.

Clearly, depression is a common problem in primary care and weight management in patients (particularly women) presenting with this problem needs to be addressed (not least because many of the medications often used to manage depression may well be part of the problem).

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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Monday, December 8, 2014

Effectiveness Of Obesity Management For Osteoarthritis

sharma-obesity-knee-osteoarthritis1Osteoarthritis is one of the most common and disabling complications of obesity. Irrespective of whether or not the osteoarthritis is directly caused by excess weight, there is little doubt that the sheer mechanical forces acting on the affected joints will significantly impact mobility and quality of life.

Now the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) has released a report on the Clinical Effectiveness of Obesity Management Interventions Delivered in Primary Care for Patients with Osteoarthritis.

This systematic review of the literature leads to the following findings:

1) Dietary weight loss interventions, either alone or in combination with exercise produce greater reductions in the peak knee compressive force and plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in knee OA patients compared with exercise-induced weight loss.

2) There is a significantly greater reduction in pain and improvements in functions in patients who received diet plus exercise interventions compared with either diet–only or exercise–only interventions.

3) Regardless of the type of weight-loss interventions, participants who lost 10% or more of baseline body weight had greater reductions in knee compressive force, systemic IL-6 concentrations, and pain, as well as gained greater improvement in function than those who lost less of their baseline weight.

4) Participants who lost the most weight also experienced greater loss of bone mass density at the femoral neck and hip, but not the spine, without a significant change of their baseline clinical classification with regards to osteoporosis or osteopenia.

Thus, in summary, weight loss, particularly when achieved through a combination of both diet and exercise can result in significant improvement in physical function, mobility, and pain scores in individuals with osteoarthritis.

Unfortunately, this is by no means easy to achieve and even harder to sustain.

Although I may sound like a broken record – we desperately need better treatments for obesity.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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Friday, December 5, 2014

Hypothalamic Inflammation In Human Obesity

sharma-obesity-astrogliosisRegular readers may recall the exciting body of work from animal models of obesity showing that hypothalamic inflammation involving microscarring (gliosis) may play an important role in appetite and energy regulation in obesity.

Now, a study by Josep Puig and colleagues from the University of Girona, Spain, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, provides evidence for a similar process in humans.

The researchers used an MRI technique called diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to measure hypothalamic damage in 24 consecutive middle-aged obese subjects (average BMI 43) and 20 healthy volunteers (average BMI 24).

Not only did the obese participants show greater signs of hypothalamic inflammation but these changes were also strongly associated with higher BMI, fat mass, inflammatory markers, carotid-intima media thickness, and hepatic steatosis and lower scores on cognitive tests.

While these studies do not prove cause and effect, these findings are consistent with findings in animal models and point to the role of pro-inflammatory pathways in the areas of the brain known to be intimately linked to appetite and energy regulation.

Understanding what exactly triggers this inflammatory response (in animal models, one fact appears to be a high-fat diet) and how this process could be inhibited, may open new avenues for obesity prevention and treatment.

@DrSharma
Madrid, Spain

ResearchBlogging.orgPuig J, Blasco G, Daunis-I-Estadella J, Molina X, Xifra G, Ricart W, Pedraza S, Fernández-Aranda F, & Fernández-Real JM (2014). Hypothalamic damage is associated with inflammatory markers and worse cognitive performance in obese subjects. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism PMID: 25423565

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Thursday, December 4, 2014

Can Gut Bugs Cause Depression?

sharma-obesity-gut-buts1Regular readers will by now be well aware of the rapidly growing body of researcher supporting the idea that your gut bugs (of which you have more than you have cells in your body) may well play a key role in determining your risk for obesity and other metabolic disorders.

Now, a paper by Ruth Ann Luna and Jane Foster from Baylor College of Medicine and McMaster University, respectively, published in Current Opinion in Biotechnology, review the evidence that gut bugs may well also have significant effects on your stress response as well as other aspects of mental healthy, including depression.

As one example, they cite a study that shows,

“…a general underrepresentation of the Bacteroidetes phylum in depressed patients and an association of the Lachnospiraceae family with the depression group, and interestingly, even with a decrease in Bacteroidetes, specific operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified as members of the Bacteroidetes phylum correlated with depression.”

They also cite a number of studies showing that stress can affect gut bug populations and that certain gut bacteriomes are associated with a greater stress response, suggesting that the relationship between gut bugs and stressors may well be a two-way street.

The authors go on to describe a number of pathways that may link gut bugs to humoral, neural, and cellular signaling pathways to brain function.

Clearly, this appears a rich area of research that may well reveal pathways common to both neurological and metabolic issues, both of which may turn out to be amenable to dietary and probiotic interventions.

@DrSharma
London, UK

ResearchBlogging.orgLuna RA, & Foster JA (2014). Gut brain axis: diet microbiota interactions and implications for modulation of anxiety and depression. Current opinion in biotechnology, 32C, 35-41 PMID: 25448230

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Monday, December 1, 2014

Are Sedentary Moms Promoting Childhood Obesity?

Edward Archer, PhD, University of Alabama Birmingham

Edward Archer, PhD, University of Alabama Birmingham

Last week, Edward Archer from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), published a paper in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings (to much media fanfare), suggesting that the primary driver of childhood obesity is the shifting of nutrient energy to fetal adipose tissue as a result of increased maternal energy availability paired with decreased maternal energy expenditure, resulting in fetal pancreatic b-cell and adipocyte hyperplasia – a theory, which Edwards labels the “maternal resource hypothesis”.

The primary process for these changes, as readers of these pages will have read before, is through epigenetic modification of DNA, which, together with other non-genetic modes of transmission including learned behaviours and environmental exposures (socioenvironmental evolution), leads to “phenotypic evolution”, which Edward describes as,

“…a unidirectional, progressive alteration in ontogeny that is propagated over multiple successive generations and may be quantified as the change over time in the population mean for the trait under examination (eg, height and obesity).”

Since the beginning of the 20th century, socioevironmental factors have significantly altered the energy balance equation for humans

“Socioenvironmental evolution has altered the evolution of human energy metabolism by inducing substantial decrements in EE imposed by daily life while improving both the quality and the quantity of nutrient-energy availability.”

“For example, as thermoneutral environments became ubiquitous, the energy cost of thermoregulation declined, and improved sanitation (eg, clean water and safer food) and vaccinations decreased the energy cost of supporting parasites (eg, fleas) and resisting pathogens (eg, communicable diseases and diarrheal infections).”

Over the past century, these developments have led to profound phenotypic changes including,

“progressive and cumulative increases in height, body stature and mass, birthweight, organ mass, head circumference, fat mass/adiposity as well as decreases in the age at which adolescents attain sexual maturity…”

Archer goes on to describe some of the many factors that may have changed in the past century, whereby, he singles out sedentariness as one of the key drivers of these developments (not surprising given Archer’s background in exercise science).

Thus, although one could perhaps make very similar arguments for any number of factor that may have changed in the past century to, in turn, affect insulin resistance and ultimately energy partitioning (change in diet, sleep deprivation, increasing maternal age, endocrine disruptors, antibiotic use, gut microbiota, medication use and many other factors I ca think of), Archer chooses to elevate sedentariness to being the main culprit.

While this may or may not be the full story, it does not change the thrust of the paper, which implies that we need to look for the key drivers of childhood obesity in the changes to the maternal-fetal (and early childhood) environment that have put us on this self-perpetuating unidirectional cycle of phenotypic evolution.

Ergo, the solution lies in focussing on the health behaviours (again, Archer emphasizes the role of physical activity) of moms.

While Archer largely focusses on maternal transmission, we should perhaps not forget that there is now some also evidence implicating a role for epigenetic modification and intergenerational transmission through paternal DNA – yes, dads are getting older and more sedentary too (not to mention fatter).

I do however agree with Edward, that this line of thinking may well have important implications for how we approach this epidemic.

For one,

“…the acknowledgment that obesity is the result of non-genetic evolutionary forces and not gluttony and sloth may help to alter the moralizing and demoralizing social and scientific discourse that pervades both public and clinical settings.”

Secondly,

“Future research may be most productive if funding is directed away from naive examinations of energy balance per se and redirected to investigations of interventions that alter the competitive strategies of various tissues.”

Thirdly,

“From the standpoint of the clinician, accurate patient phenotyping (inclusive of family obstetric history and metabolic profiling) may allow the targeting of women most likely to be a part of populations that have evolved beyond the metabolic tipping point and therefore require significant preconception intervention.”

While none of this may be easier or more feasible than other current efforts, they may well point us in a different direction than conventional theories about what is driving childhood obesity.

@DrSharma
Calgary, AB

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In The News

Diabetics in most need of bariatric surgery, university study finds

Oct. 18, 2013 – Ottawa Citizen: "Encouraging more men to consider bariatric surgery is also important, since it's the best treatment and can stop diabetic patients from needing insulin, said Dr. Arya Sharma, chair in obesity research and management at the University of Alberta." Read article

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