Friday, August 1, 2014

The 5As of Healthy Pregnancy Weight Gain

5AsPregnancy_PractitionerGuide_rf-final_Page_01Yesterday, the Canadian Obesity Network released the 5As of Healthy Pregnancy Weight Gain.

This follows the release of the 5As of Obesity Management (adults) and the 5As of Pediatric Weight Management.

The 5As of Health Pregnancy Weight Gain, was developed by a working group of nurses, midwives, primary care physicians, obstetricians, researchers and policy makers convened by the Network.

It is based on the best available evidence on this topic and is intended to help primary care practitioners discuss and manage gestational weight with their patients.

The 5As of Healthy Pregnancy Weight Gain is based on the following 5 key principles:

  • Discussion about gestational weight gain should occur with every pregnant women and with every woman planning a pregnancy.

  • Achieving healthy gestational weight gain is about improving the health and well-being of both mothers and babies.

  • Early action means addressing root causes and removing roadblocks.

  • Pregnancy related health beliefs can be powerful influences on weight gain in pregnancy.

  • Achieving goals is different for every woman.

The 5As of Health Pregnancy Weight Gain can be downloaded here – pdfppt

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

p.s. if you did not receive the Obesity Network Newsletter with this announcement due to Canada’s new anti-spam legislation, please click here.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Low Adipocyte Formation Is Associated With Abdominal Obesity

sharma-obesity-adipocytes3One of the key concepts about the deposition of visceral and ectopic fat is the inability of “healthy” subcutaneous to readily expand to accommodate excess calories. This is why people with large fat cells and those with less or no subcutaneous fat (as in partial or complete lipodystrophy) display features of the metabolic syndrome.

In line with these observations, a study by Andre Tchernof and colleagues from the University of Laval, Quebec, in a paper published in ADIPOCYTE show that low adipogenic capacity of subcutaneous adipose tissue is associated with visceral obesity, visceral adipocyte hypertrophy, and a dysmetabolic state.

The researchers studied adipocytes and preadipocytes isolated from subcutaneous and visceral fat samples from 35 women undergoing gynecological surgery and assessed body fat distribution by CT as well as fasting plasma lipids and glycemia.

Using an in vitro differentiation assay, they found that lower adipogenic rates were strongly associated with increased visceral cell size and dyslipidemia.

In addition, When matched for BMI, women with low subcutaneous preadipocyte adipogenic rates had a higher visceral adipose tissue area, omental adipocyte hypertrophy, higher VLDL-lipid content and higher fasting glycemia.

All of these findings are in line with the notion that low subcutaneous preadipocyte differentiation capacity in vitro is associated with visceral obesity, visceral adipocyte hypertrophy, and a dysmetabolic state.

Once again, as regular readers should be aware, not all fat is equal.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgLessard J, Laforest S, Pelletier M, Leboeuf M, Blackburn L, & Tchernof A (2014). Low abdominal subcutaneous preadipocyte adipogenesis is associated with visceral obesity, visceral adipocyte hypertrophy, and a dysmetabolic state. Adipocyte, 3 (3), 197-205 PMID: 25068086

.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (2 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Prebiotic Fibre Alters Mother Milk and Offspring Gut Bacteria in Rats

sharma-obesity-suckling-rat1With all the attention to the role of gut microbiota and the ongoing debate as to the role of breast feeding in obesity prevention, a study by Raylene Reimer and colleagues from the University of Calgary adds an interesting spin.

Their study, now published in OBESITY shows that feeding female rat a diet high in prebiotic fibre (21.6% wt/wt) throughout pregnancy and lactation, compared to a control or high-protien (40% wt/wt) diet, results in a lower oligosaccharide content of the milk with a higher content of bifidobacteria in the offspring.

Although this did not lead to any marked differences in body composition or other metabolic parameters, the study proves the point that (at least in rats) maternal diet can affect the composition of gut bacteria in the offspring (which may or may not have metabolic benefits).

There is no reason to believe that in humans maternal nutrition may well impart a similar influence via breast feeding on the microbiota of infants.

This certainly sounds like a promising field for future research.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgHallam MC, Barile D, Meyrand M, German JB, & Reimer RA (2014). Maternal high protein or prebiotic fiber diets affect maternal milk composition and gut microbiota in rat dams and their offspring. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) PMID: 25056822

.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

5th Conference on Childhood and Adolescent Obesity, Winnipeg, Sept 23-26, 2014

Jonathan McGavock, PhD, Assoc. Professor, Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, MB

Jonathan McGavock, PhD, Assoc. Professor, Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, MB

For readers interested in the prevention and management of childhood and adolescent obesity, there is still time to submit your abstract (deadline Aug 5) and to register for this event in Winnipeg.

Those of you, who have been to previous meetings in this series, will know that this meeting (interspersed biennially with the Canadian Obesity Summit) brings together clinicians, researchers, policy makers and other stakeholders for 4 days of intense networking and knowledge exchange.

This year’s conference is being organised by Jon McGavock from the Manitoba Institute of Child Health and is sure to be a blast.

Given Jon’s interest in this area, this year’s conference will include a strong focus on the burden of obesity among Indigenous Youth and showcase examples of the best and promising practices within Indigenous communities across Canada and the US.

This special theme will include presentations from Indigenous youth living in communities with a high burden of obesity, sharing circles with Indigenous leaders and stakeholders and will explore interventions designed to promote these strengths and enhance resiliency among children and adolescents.

Of course, the conference will also cover a wide range of other topics related to childhood obesity across the age and care continuum.

View CE Credits HERE.

Brochure is available HERE.

Register for the conference HERE.

Registration for the pre-conference only HERE.

Submit your abstract HERE.

Incidentally, I will be having the privilege of giving a keynote at the opening of the pre-conference.

While in Winnipeg, I will also be performing my “Stop Being a Yo-Yo” show at the Colin Jackson Studio Theatre on Sept. 24, Show time: 7:00 p.m. (click HERE for online tickets).

See you in Winnipeg!

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (2 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Obesity Weekend Roundup, July 25, 2014

As not everyone may have a chance during the week to read every post, here’s a roundup of last week’s posts:

Recommended Web Sites

Leading information on COPD. Receive new GOUT treatment information and find clinical trials at www.discoverclinicaltrials.com

Colleagues
Dr. Shafiq Qaadri - Official Site
Dr. Richard Tytus - Official Site
Dr. Stuart Weprin - Official Site

In The News

Diabetics in most need of bariatric surgery, university study finds

Oct. 18, 2013 – Ottawa Citizen: "Encouraging more men to consider bariatric surgery is also important, since it's the best treatment and can stop diabetic patients from needing insulin, said Dr. Arya Sharma, chair in obesity research and management at the University of Alberta." Read article

» More news articles...

Publications

  • Subscribe via Email

    Enter your email address:

    Delivered by FeedBurner




  • Arya Mitra Sharma
  • Disclaimer

    Postings on this blog represent the personal views of Dr. Arya M. Sharma. They are not representative of or endorsed by Alberta Health Services or the Weight Wise Program.
  • Archives

     

  • RSS Weighty Matters

  • Click for related posts

  • Disclaimer

    Medical information and privacy
    Any medical discussion on this page is intended to be of a general nature only. This page is not designed to give specific medical advice. If you have a medical problem you should consult your own physician for advice specific to your own situation.


  • Meta

  • Obesity Links

  • If you have benefitted from the information on this site, please take a minute to donate to its maintenance.

  • Home | News | KOL | Media | Publications | Trainees | About
    Copyright 2008–2014 Dr. Arya Sharma, All rights reserved.
    Blog Widget by LinkWithin