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What Behaviours Are Important For Optimal Outcomes With Bariatric Surgery?



sharma-obesity-gastric_bypass_roux-en-y3Bariatric surgery is by far the most effective treatment for severe obesity but outcomes vary from one patient to the next.

Now a paper by James Mitchell and colleagues, published in JAMA Surgery, reports on the postoperative eating behaviors and weight control strategies that are associated with differences in body weight seen at 3 years after bariatric surgery.

The study looks atĀ self-reported data from over 2000 participants in the The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 (LABS-2) study, a multicenter observational cohort study at 10 US hospitals in 6 geographically diverse clinical centers in the USA. Participants completed detailed surveys regarding eating and weight control behaviors prior to surgery and then annually after surgery for 3 years.

The researchers assessed 25 postoperative behaviors related to eating, weight control practices, and the use of alcohol, smoking, and illegal drugs.

The three key behaviours associated with poor outcomes were lack of weekly self-weighing, continuing to eat when feeling full more than once a week, and eating continuously during the day.

Thus, a participant who postoperatively started to self-weigh regularly, stopped eating when feeling full, and stopped eating continuously during the day after surgery would be predicted to lose almost 40% of their baseline weight compared to only 24% weight loss in participants who did not adopt these behaviours.

Other behaviours that had negative influences on outcomes included problematic use of alcohol, smoking and illegal drugs.

Thus, as one may have suspected all along, helping patients adopt and adhere to behavioural changes that include self-montioring and mindful eating behaviours can be expected to substantially affect the success of bariatric surgery.

@DrSharmma
Seoul, South Korea

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