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Canadian Human Rights Petitions Against Sizeism

Screen Shot 2015-03-11 at 10.45.43 PMDiscrimination based on appearance, which includes size, are rampant and well documented in virtually all social, educational, and professional settings. Unfortunately, current legislation does not offer individuals who experience with this form of discrimination the same legal protection as it does to people, who are discriminated against due to colour, gender, sexual orientation, or a host of other factors.

Now, there are at least three ongoing public petitions in Canada calling upon the Human Rights commissioners to make size and appearance discrimination illegal (#SizeismSUCKS).

Thus, a recent petition in Ontario has currently garnered over 8,500 signatures – just short of 10,000.

Similar petitions in Alberta, Manitoba, and British Columbia are just beginning to gather momentum.

As Jill Andrews, the initiator of the Ontario petition notes:

“At 14, I was told by another teen that I was ‘as big as a Mack Truck’ and someone would only date me if ‘they put a paper bag over my head.’ I told my teacher and she told me to ‘be strong…it would pass with time.’ At 20, I was denied a job and told, I was ‘so very talented with an infectious personality . . . but just too big for the screen.’ I wasn’t even fat.”

As Jill further points out,

“Appearance-based protection would mean human rights protection against size, weight, height discrimination and other differences such as visible scars, alopecia or facial differences for instance. All too many of us live under a cloud of stereotypes and judgments made about us because of how we look, whether we’re big or small. These judgments often come with real social, mental, physical and economic consequences. Some of us don’t pursue the careers and the lives we want because we are simply too scared of being treated without humanity because of our size. Some of us are even too afraid to go to the doctors when we are sick in fear of further body-shaming. Some of us take our own lives.”

As in other provinces,

“The Ontario Human Rights Code (OHRC) recognizes this in regards to race, gender, sexual orientation and other necessary protected grounds but body size and physical appearance remains absent.”

You can help change this by supporting the various petitions (especially the one in your province):

To sign the petition in Ontario click here

To sign the petition in Alberta click here

To sign the petition in Manitoba click here

To sign the petition in British Columbia click here

To start a similar petition in your own province click here

You can make a difference!

@DrSharma
Vancouver, BC

 

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We Desperately Need Scalable Treatments For Obesity

NN Benefits White Paper CoverObesity, defined as the presence of abnormal or excess body fat that impairs health, currently affects 100s of millions of people worldwide.

Although “weight-loss” is a booming global multi-billion dollar business, we desperately lack effective long-term treatments for this chronic disease – the vast majority of people who fall prey to the natural supplement, diet, and fitness industry will on occasion manage to lose weight – but few will keep it off.

Thus, there is little evidence that the majority (or even just a significant proportion) of people trying to lose weight with help of the “commercial weight loss industry” will experience long-term health benefits.

When it comes to evidence-based treatments, there is ample evidence that behavioural interventions can help patients achieve and sustain important health benefits, but the magnitude of sustainable weight loss is modest (3-5% of initial weight at best).

Furthermore, although one may think that “behavioural” or “lifestyle” interventions are cost-effective, this is by no means the case. Successful behaviour change requires significant intervention by trained health professionals, a limited and expensive resource to which most patients will never have access. Moreover, there is ample evidence showing maintenance of long-term behaviour change requires significant on-going resources in terms of follow-up visits – thus adding to the cost.

This severely limits the scalability of behavioural treatments for obesity.

If for example, every Canadian with obesity (around 7,000,000) met with a registered dietitian just twice a year on an ongoing basis (which is probably far less than required to sustain ongoing behaviour change), the Canadian Health Care system would need to provide 14,000,000 dietitian consultations for obesity alone.

Given that there are currently fewer than 10,000 registered dietitians in Canada, each dietitian would need to do 14,000 consultations for obesity annually (~ 70 consultations per day) or look after approximately 7,000 clients living with obesity each year. Even if some of these consultations were not done by dietitians but by less-qualified health professionals, it is easy to see how this approach is simply not scalable to the size of the problem.

A similar calculation can be easily made for clinical psychologists or exercise physiologists.

Thus, behavioural interventions for obesity, delivered by trained and licensed  healthcare professionals are simply not a scalable (or cost-effective) option.

At the other extreme, we now have considerable long-term data supporting the morbidity, mortality, and quality of life benefits of bariatric surgery. However, bariatric surgery is also not scalable to the magnitude of the problem

There are currently well over 1,500,000 Canadians living with obesity that is severe enough to warrant the costs and risks of surgery. However, at the current pace of 10,000 surgeries a year (a number that is unlikely to dramatically increase in the near future), it would take over 150 years to operate every Canadian with severe obesity alive today.

This is where we have to look at how Canada has made significant strides in managing the millions of Canadians living with other chronic diseases?

How are we managing the over 5,000,000 Canadians living with hypertension?

How are we managing the over 2.5 million Canadians living with diabetes?

How are we managing the over 1.5 million Canadians living with heart disease?

The answer to all is – with the help of prescription medications.

There are now millions of Canadians who benefit from their daily dose of blood pressure-, glucose-, and cholesterol-lowering medications. The lives saved by the use of these medications in Canada alone is in the 10s of thousands each year.

So, if millions of Canadians take medications for other chronic diseases (clearly a scalable approach), where are the medications for obesity?

Sadly, there are currently only two prescription medications available to Canadians (neither scalable, one due to cost the other due to unacceptable side effects).

So what would it take to find treatments for obesity that are scalable to the magnitude of the problem?

More on that in tomorrow’s post.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, Ab

 

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Will WHO STOPS Childhood Obesity Promote Weight Bias And Unhealthy Body Image?

sharma-obesity-kids-playing-outsideChildhood obesity is a grave concern and so far community based interventions to prevent it have been rare and far between, with little evidence that any changes (however meagre) are in fact sustainable over time and will actually lead to a reduction in adult obesity.

Thus, the Australian team of Steven Allander and colleagues must be commended on embarking on what I believe will be the first cluster randomized trial in ten communities in the Great South Coast Region of Victoria, Australia to test whether it is possible to: (1) strengthen community action for childhood obesity prevention, and (2) measure the impact of increased action on risk factors for childhood obesity.

According to the trial design published in the International Journal of Environmental Research in Public Health, the WHO STOPS intervention will involve a facilitated community engagement process that: creates an agreed systems map of childhood obesity causes for a community; identifies intervention opportunities through leveraging the dynamic aspects of the system; and, converts these understandings into community-built, systems-oriented action plans.

Ten communities will be randomized (1:1) to intervention or control in year one and all communities will be included by year three.

The primary outcome is childhood obesity prevalence among grade two (ages 7–8 y), grade four (9–10 y) and grade six (11–12 y) students measured using established community-led monitoring system (69% school and 93% student participation rate in government and independent schools).

An additional group of 13 external communities from other regions of Victoria with no specific interventions will provide an external comparison.

All of this makes sense and is highly commendable.

What is shockingly lacking however – at least I see no mention of this in the published study design – is the inclusion of an explicit focus on what such community interventions aimed at reducing childhood obesity, will do to self-esteem and body image of the kids involved and weight bias in the communities overall.

Indeed, I see no mention of anyone with an explicit expertise in weight bias or kids mental health on the panel of researchers involved in this study.

This is concerning, as we now understand well that body image concerns and both implicit and explicit weight bias begin in kindergarten-age kids and must acknowledge that the “moral panic” created around childhood obesity has been accused of further promoting eating disorders, body image issues and weight bias.

Thus, we have here the unique opportunity to study the potential harm that could be done by school “surveillance” programs that assess body weight in kids or by the well-meant education on “healthy activity and healthy eating” that may teach kids that obesity is simply a result of making poor choices and not moving enough (rather than a complex biopsychosocial chronic disease, that is highly resistant to lasting effects of time-limited interventions).

I would sincerely appeal to the researchers involved to amend their study protocol to include changes in weight bias, unhealthy weight obsessions, body image issues, and eating disorders both at the level of the kids and the community overall, to ensure that the well-meant interventions do not inadvertently replace one problem with another – as always, the Devil of public health interventions lies in the unintended consequences.

In fact, if I was on the ethics committee tasked with approving this study, I would insist that an in-depth assessment plan for the potential harm of this intervention be in place before commencement of any study related activities in the relevant communities.

If the overall goal of the WHO STOPS intervention is to have a healthier generation of kids, nothing is more important than fully understanding the potential impact of this intervention on mental health and social attitudes towards kids and adults living with obesity.

@DrSharma
Copenhagen, DK

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Bullying In Science And Health Promotion

sharma-obesity2012_intro_webWe no doubt live in an era where bullying is not only deemed acceptable but may actually help get you into high public office.

Unfortunately, bullying is a tactic that is all too often used even by people who should know better – people, who have made it their mission to promoting a health agenda, and should be well aware of the health consequences (not to mention the humanistic or moral consequences) of bullying.

Now, a thoughtful article by Michael Sanger and colleagues, published in Progress in Cardiovascular Research, discusses why bullying tactics and ad hominem attacks against fellow scientists can only be detrimental to scientific progress.

As they point out,

“The acquisition of beneficial new knowledge is difficult, and it is even more challenging in an environment of incivility. Abusive name-calling and bullying can become a regular part of the life of a scientist, all the more so since the advent of the Internet and social media. Moreover, the likelihood of communicative discord increases according to the potential impact of a scientist’s work. Such ad hominem attacks neither aim nor succeed at advancing science, and can have adverse consequences on a personal level and for science in general.”

Bullying in science can take many forms, the most common including accusations of conflict of interest or ulterior motives, right down to outright personal attacks and name calling.

Thus,

“Personal attacks work via the halo effect, a cognitive bias in which the perception of one trait is influenced by the perception of an unrelated trait, such as relating the private debt of a person to professional unreliability. Oftentimes, people tend to idealistically see others as all ‘good’ or all ‘bad’; thus, if one can attribute a bad (if unrelated) trait to a scientist, this may invariably raise doubts about the quality of his/her work.”

Similarly,

“Ad hominem attacks often aim at rediminishing a scientist’s credibility or implying a conflict of interest that makes the scientists statements seem invalid. For example, there is a common – indeed, near universal – view that those who are linked with for-profit companies are heavily conflicted whereas those employed in public or academic institutions, generally speaking are not. People who work for public sector institutions regard themselves (and are often regarded) as being neutral and unbiased supporters and defenders of the public interest. There is, however, a large literature by economists and political scientists known as ‘public choice theory’ that demolishes this pretension.Public institutions and the individuals who work for them are found to be self-interested, much like industries and their employees. Individuals working for public institutions with a certain culture know that their career prospects may be advantaged by being a part of that culture rather than iconoclasts.”

Whereas genuine experts debating content is an intrinsic part of the scientific method, when non-experts (or self-proclaimed experts) imply improprieties, merely because they disagree with the findings, or have potential conflicts of interest themselves, they are are a hindrance to it.

As the authors discuss, the media loves nothing better than when a scientist is called out because of some perceived conflict of interest or opinion that does not set well with the attacker.

In this context, bystanders who chose to remain silent are anything but “innocent”.

“Silence can make bullying the norm; it implicitly validates the behavior. A scientist or researcher who is bullied (or sees other being bullied) will often remain silent, fearing that speaking out may incur additional abuse and/or negative media coverage. Staying silent often allows the bullying to continue and even escalate. Attacking the individual expressing a novel idea is neither constructive nor productive, and may substantively impede the free-thinking required to achieve scientific advancements.”

We live in a time that has been described as the era of anti-science.

This label does not just apply to overt anti-vaxxers, creationists, and climate change deniers – there is indeed a growing chunk of the general public, that increasingly views all science (and all scientists) with scepticism and deep mistrust.

It does not help that all scientists are seen as having their hands in the pockets of industry – big food, big pharma, big energy, big whatever – no matter what their actual science tells us.

No one can be trusted, everyone has been bought, your scientific fact carries the same weight as my personal (uninformed) opinion.

Scientific progress (and funding for it) is at stake.

This is not about creating “safe spaces” – it is about civility and respect for the scientific process and for your fellow scientists.

The public mistrust of science is great enough – we certainly do not need scientists or health experts joining the fray.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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5th Canadian Obesity Summit – Four More Days To Submit Your Abstracts!

banff-springs-hotelEvery two years the Canadian Obesity Network holds its National Obesity Summit – the only national obesity meeting in Canada covering all aspects of obesity – from basic and population science to prevention and health promotion to clinical management and health policy.

Anyone who has been to one of the past four Summits has experienced the cross-disciplinary networking and breaking down of silos (the Network takes networking very seriously).

Of all the scientific meetings I go to around the world, none has quite the informal and personal feel of the Canadian Obesity Summit – despite all differences in interests and backgrounds, everyone who attends is part of the same community – working on different pieces of the puzzle that only makes sense when it all fits together in the end.

The 5th Canadian Obesity Summit will be held at the Banff Springs Hotel in Banff National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, located in the heart of the Canadian Rockies (which in itself should make it worth attending the summit), April 25-29, 2017.

Yesterday, the call went out for abstracts and workshops – the latter an opportunity for a wide range of special interest groups to meet and discuss their findings (the last Summit featured over 20 separate workshops – perhaps a tad too many, which is why the program committee will be far more selective this time around).

So here is what the program committee is looking for:

  • Basic science – cellular, molecular, physiological or neuronal related aspects of obesity
  • Epidemiology – epidemiological techniques/methods to address obesity related questions in populations studies
  • Prevention of obesity and health promotion interventions – research targeting different populations, settings, and intervention levels (e.g. community-based, school, workplace, health systems, and policy)
  • Weight bias and weight-based discrimination – including prevalence studies as well as interventions to reduce weight bias and weight-based discrimination; both qualitative and quantitative studies
  • Pregnancy and maternal health – studies across clinical, health services and population health themes
  • Childhood and adolescent obesity – research conducted with children and or adolescents and reports on the correlates, causes and consequences of pediatric obesity as well as interventions for treatment and prevention.
  • Obesity in adults and older adults – prevalence studies and interventions to address obesity in these populations
  • Health services and policy research – reaserch addressing issues related to obesity management services which idenitfy the most effective ways to organize, manage, finance, and deliver high quality are, reduce medical errors or improve patient safety
  • Bariatric surgery – issues that are relevant to metabolic or weight loss surgery
  • Clinical management – clinical management of overweight and obesity across the life span (infants through to older adults) including interventions for prevention and treatment of obesity and weight-related comorbidities
  • Rehabilitation –  investigations that explore opportunities for engagement in meaningful and health-building occupations for people with obesity
  • Diversity – studies that are relevant to diverse or underrepresented populations
  • eHealth/mHealth – research that incorporates social media, internet and/or mobile devices in prevention and treatment
  • Cancer – research relevant to obesity and cancer

…..and of course anything else related to obesity.

Deadline for submission is October 24, 2016

To submit an abstract or workshop – click here

For more information on the 5th Canadian Obesity Summit – click here

For sponsorship opportunities – click here

Looking forward to seeing you in Banff next year!

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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