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Plan Your Personalized Program For The Canadian Obesity Summit Now

Summit15appIf you are planning to attend the 4th Canadian Obesity Summit in Toronto next week (and anyone else, who is interested), you can now download the program app on your mobile, tablet, laptop, desktop, eReader, or anywhere else – the app works on all major platforms and operating systems, even works offline.

You can access and download the app here.

(To watch a brief video on how to install this app on your device click here)

You can then create an individual profile (including photo) and a personalised day-by-day schedule.

Obviously, you can also search by speakers, topics, categories, and other criteria.

Hoping to see you at the Summit next week – have a great weekend!

@DrSharma
Gurgaon, Haryana

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Online Course on Weight Bias With Dr. Sara Kirk

Sara Kirk, PhD., Canada Research Chair in Health Services Research, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Sara Kirk, PhD., Canada Research Chair in Health Services Research, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Regular readers will be well of the very real social and health impact of weight bias and discrimination.

Now, Sara Kirk of Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, invites you to join her free Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), on weight bias and stigma in obesity, which will be starting on April 20th 2015 (just a week before the Canadian Obesity Summit in Toronto).

The course builds on Kirk’s extensive research in this area and the dramatic presentation that was created from her findings.

Participants will be able to explore some of the personal and professional biases that surround weight management and that impact patient care and experience.

This will hopefully give health professionals better insight into how to approach individuals experiencing obesity in a respectful and non-judgmental manner and provide strategies to build positive and supportive relationships between health care providers and patients.

While targeted at health care providers, the course should also be of interest to anyone interested in learning more about what weight bias is and how it can impact health and relationships.

Participants who complete the course requirements can apply for a citation of completion (for a nominal fee).

For your FREE registration, please visit the course listing and registration page here.

@DrSharma
Copenhagen, DK

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Fear of Fat: Promoting Health In a Fat-Phobic Culture

Screen Shot 2015-03-11 at 10.45.43 PMToday I will be attending a Summit on Weight Bias at the University of Calgary, that will explore the the issue of weight-based discrimination and ways to address this – especially in health care settings.

It should come as no surprise that weight bias and discrimination are a major barrier to providing proper preventive and therapeutic health care due to the widespread attitudes and beliefs about obesity that exist amongst health professionals and decision makers.

The scientific summit, co-sponsored by the Canadian Obesity Network, Campus Alberta, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), is complemented by a public Cafe Scientifique that will be held on Thursday, March 12, 7.00 at the Parkdale Community Association, 3512 – 5 Ave NW, in Calgary.

For more information and pre-registration for this free public event, which features

Leora Pinhas, MD
Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist, Physician Lead, Eating Disorders Unit, Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences Assistant Professor, University of Toronto

Tavis Campbell, PhD
Professor, Department of Psychology and Oncology & Director, Behavioural Medicine Laboratory, University of Calgary

Yoni Freedhoff, MD, CCFP
Medical Director, Bariatric Medical Institute, Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa

 click here.

@DrSharma
Calgary, AB

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Early Bird Registration For Canadian Obesity Summit Ends March 3rd

For all my Canadian readers (and any international readers planning to attend), here just a quick reminder that the deadline for early bird discount registration for the upcoming 4th Canadian Obesity Summit in Toronto, April 28 – May 2, ends March 3rd.

To anyone who has been at a previous Canadian Summit, attending is certainly a “no-brainer” – for anyone, who hasn’t been, check out these workshops that are only part of the 5-day scientific program – there are also countless plenary sessions and poster presentations – check out the full program here.

Workshops:

Public Engagement Workshop (By Invitation Only)

Pre-Summit Prep Course – Overview of Obesity Management ($50)

Achieving Patient‐Centeredness in Obesity Management within Primary Care Settings

Obesity in young people with physical disabilities

CON-SNP Leadership Workshop: Strengthening CON-SNP from the ground up (Invitation only)

Exploring the Interactions Between Physical Well-Being and Obesity

Healthy Food Retail: Local public‐private partnerships to improve availability of healthy food in retail settings

How Can I Prepare My Patient for Bariatric Surgery? Practical tips from orientation to operating room

Intergenerational Determinants of Obesity: From programming to parenting

Neighbourhood Walkability and its Relationship with Walking: Does measurement matter?

The EPODE Canadian Obesity Forum: Game Changer

Achieving and Maintaining Healthy Weight with Every Step

Adolescent Bariatric Surgery – Now or Later? Teen and provider perspectives

Preventive Care 2020: A workshop to design the ideal experience to engage patients with obesity in preventive healthcare

Promoting Healthy Maternal Weights in Pregnancy and Postpartum

Rewriting the Script on Weight Management: Interprofessional workshop

SciCom-muniCON: Science Communication-Sharing and exchanging knowledge from a variety of vantage points

The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care’s guidelines on obesity prevention and management in adults and children in primary care

Paediatric Obesity Treatment Workshop (Invitation only)

Balanced View: Addressing weight bias and stigma in healthcare

Drugs, Drinking and Disordered Eating: Managing challenging cases in bariatric surgery

From Mindless to Mindful Waiting: Tools to help the bariatric patient succeed

Getting Down to Basics in Designing Effective Programs to Promote Health and Weight Loss

Improving Body Image in Our Patients: A key component of weight management

Meal Replacements in Obesity Management: A psychosocial and behavioural intervention and/or weight loss tool

Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents: A translational view

Weight Bias: What do we know and where can we go from here?

Energy Balance in the Weight- Reduced Obese Individual: A biological reality that favours weight regain

Innovative and Collaborative Models of Care for Obesity Treatment in the Early Years

Transition of Care in Obesity Management : Bridging the gap between pediatric and adult healthcare services

Neuromuscular Meeting workshop – Please note: Separate registration is required for this event at no charge

To register – click here.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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How To Tell If You May Be A Food Addict

sharma-obesity-fat-dietingFollowing the recent guest posts by Drs Vera Tarman and Pam Peeke on food addiction, many readers have left comments about how this notion rings true to them and how the ideas of treating their “eating disorder” as an addiction has helped them better control their diet and often lose substantial amount of weight.

Others have asked how to tell if they might be food addicts. For them, I am reproducing the following list of 20 questions taken from Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous.

Although it is important to note that “food addiction” has yet to be officially recognized as a medical/psychiatric condition and the following questions are by no means “diagnostic”, I would still support the idea that the more of these questions you answer with yes, the more likely you may benefit from discussing this problem with someone who has expertise in addictions (rather than simply going of on another diet or exercise program).

1. Have you ever wanted to stop eating and found you just couldn’t?

2. Do you think about food or your weight constantly?

3. Do you find yourself attempting one diet or food plan after another, with no lasting success?

4. Do you binge and then “get rid of the binge” through vomiting, exercise, laxatives, or other forms of purging?

5. Do you eat differently in private than you do in front of other people?

6. Has a doctor or family member ever approached you with concern about your eating habits or weight?

7. Do you eat large quantities of food at one time (binge)?

8. Is your weight problem due to your “nibbling” all day long?

9. Do you eat to escape from your feelings?

10. Do you eat when you’re not hungry?

11. Have you ever discarded food, only to retrieve and eat it later?

12. Do you eat in secret?

13. Do you fast or severely restrict your food intake?

14. Have you ever stolen other people’s food?

15. Have you ever hidden food to make sure you have “enough?”

16. Do you feel driven to exercise excessively to control your weight?

17. Do you obsessively calculate the calories you’ve burned against the calories you’ve eaten?

18. Do you frequently feel guilty or ashamed about what you’ve eaten?

19. Are you waiting for your life to begin “when you lose the weight?”

20. Do you feel hopeless about your relationship with food?

@DrSharma
Burlington, ON

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