Thursday, July 17, 2014

Infant Antibiotic Exposure and Obesity Risk

sharma-obesity-gut-buts1With all the interest in the role of the gut bacteriome in the development of obesity, it was only a matter of time before someone examined the relationship between antibiotic use and obesity risk.

This is exactly what Anita Kozyrskyj and colleagues from the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, explored in a paper now published in the International Journal of Obesity.

For their study they linked rovincial healthcare records to clinical and survey data from a Canadian longitudinal birth cohort study, whereby antibiotic exposure during the first year of life was documented from prescription records.

Overweight and central adiposity were determined from anthropometric measurements at ages 9 (n=616) and 12 (n=431) years.

According to this analysis, infants receiving antibiotics in the first year of life were about twice as likely to be overweight later in childhood compared to those who were unexposed.

However, after adjustment for birth weight, breastfeeding, maternal overweight and other potential confounders, this association persisted in boys but not in girls. The reason for this discrepancy is not clear.

Although these findings are in line with the notion that early use of antibiotics may predispose to obesity, it is important to not that these type of studies cannot prove causality.

It may well be that other non-measured factors could explain this association (e.g. overprotective or lower SES parents may be more likely to use antibiotics in their infants – both factors are independently associated with higher rates of obesity).

Nevertheless, given the rather high rates of antibiotic exposure in infants it appears that this may well be a promising area for further research not just in the context of obesity but also for many of the other conditions that are now believed to be influenced by intestinal flora.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgAzad MB, Bridgman SL, Becker AB, & Kozyrskyj AL (2014). Infant antibiotic exposure and the development of childhood overweight and central adiposity. International journal of obesity (2005) PMID: 25012772

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Thursday, July 10, 2014

Can Germs In Your Drinking Water Help Prevent Obesity?

sharma-obesity-tap-water1In my show I joke about how I intend to import water from the river Ganges as a new obesity treatment that I will appropriately name “RunFast”.

Jokes aside, a study by Zhongyi Chen and colleagues, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, shows that treating mice with genetically modified bugs delivered through their drinking water can protect them from becoming obese even when fed a high-fat diet.

To be exact, the researchers used a strain of e coli bacteria genetically engineered to produce N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs), which are precursors to the N-acylethanolamide (NAE) family of lipids, normally synthesized in the small intestine in response to feeding and known to reduce food intake.

As their study shows, administration of these modified bacteria in drinking water for 8 weeks dramatically lowered food intake, weight gain, body fat, insulin resistance and liver fat in mice on a high-fat diet.

These “protective effects” lasted for at least 4 weeks after removal of these bacteria from the drinking water.

In another set of experiments the researchers also showed that this strain of bacteria reduced weight gain in a genetic model of mouse obesity.

Contrary to what one may believe, this study neither supports nor refutes the idea that gut bacteria may be partly responsible for the obesity epidemic.

Rather, the study primarily shows that bacteria may be used as a delivery system for “therapeutic doses” of molecules to the intestines – in this case, resulting in the modification of appetite and metabolism.

I would not be surprised if the therapeutic use of bacteria (genetically modified or not) opens up a whole new dimension of therapeutics – not just for obesity.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgChen Z, Guo L, Zhang Y, L Walzem R, Pendergast JS, Printz RL, Morris LC, Matafonova E, Stien X, Kang L, Coulon D, McGuinness OP, Niswender KD, & Davies SS (2014). Incorporation of therapeutically modified bacteria into gut microbiota inhibits obesity. The Journal of clinical investigation PMID: 24960158

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Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Does BMI Underestimate Adiposity in Kids?

sharma-obesity-kids-scale2Regular readers are well aware of my reservations regarding the use of BMI as a diagnostic parameter in clinical practice. After all, while BMI may tell us how big someone is, it certainly is not a good measure of how sick someone is.

But to be honest, BMI was never intended as a measure of disease – it was (at best) introduced as a surrogate measure of adiposity (fatness).

Nevertheless, supporters of BMI continue to argue that it is still a good measure of fatness and as such should remain part of standard assessment – even in kids.

Now, a paper by Javed and colleagues, published in Pediatric Obesity, examines how well BMI performs as a means to identify obesity as defined by body fatness in children and adolescents.

The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 37 studies in over 53,000 participants assessing the diagnostic performance of BMI to detect adiposity in children up to 18 years.

While the commonly used BMI cut-offs for obesity showed showed a high specificity (0.93) to detect high adiposity, the sensitivity was much lower (0.73) – particularly in boys.

This means that kids who exceed the current BMI cut-offs are indeed very likely to have fatter bodies (for what it’s worth).

On the other hand, relying on BMI cut-offs alone will miss as many as 25% of kids whose body fat percentage exceeds current definitions of adiposity.

Thus, assuming that bod fatness or adiposity is indeed a clinically useful measure of health, the use of BMI alone will ‘underdiagnose’ adiposity in a significant proportion of kids (especially boys) who may well be at risk from excess fat.

A word of caution about fatness is certainly in order – as in adults, much depends on exactly where the fat is located (abdominal or ectopic vs. subcutaneous) and other factors (e.g. cell size, inflammation, insulin sensitivity, etc.).

Thus, even if BMI was a perfect measure of body fat, it would probably still require further examinations and tests to determine exactly whether or not this “extra” fat poses a health risk.

As in adults, a clinical staging system similar to the Edmonton Obesity Staging System may be a fat better indicator of determining which kids may need to worry about their body fat and which don’t.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

Hat tip to Kristi Adamo for pointing me to this study

ResearchBlogging.orgJaved A, Jumean M, Murad MH, Okorodudu D, Kumar S, Somers VK, Sochor O, & Lopez-Jimenez F (2014). Diagnostic performance of body mass index to identify obesity as defined by body adiposity in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Pediatric obesity PMID: 24961794

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Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Social Anxiety As A Deterrent To Physical Activity

sharma-obesity-distored-body-image1Social anxiety, defined as persistent fears of one or more social situations in which the person is exposed to others and expects to be scrutinized, has been reported in as many as one in ten individuals with overweight or obesity.

Now, a paper by Abbas Abdollahi and Mansor Abu Talib, published in Psychology, Health and Medicine, examines the relationship between social anxiety and sedentary behaviour in this population.

The researchers surveyed 207 overweight and obese students (measured heights and weights) using a number of validated instruments to assess social anxiety, sedentariness and body esteem.

As one might expect, social anxiety was associated with lower body esteem and higher sedentary behaviour.

The key mediator in this relationship was body dissatisfaction and poor body esteem.

Thus,

“…obese individuals with poor body esteem are more likely to report social anxiety, because they are concerned about negative evaluation by others; therefore, obese individuals indicate avoidance behaviour, which, ultimately, leads to social anxiety.”

The implications of these findings are obvious,

“First, when assessing the social anxiety in individuals, it is important to account for the presence of sedentary behaviour in addition to other psychological risk factors. Second, reducing sedentary behaviour can alter the effect of social anxiety factors; this may be a significant factor to incorporate into social anxiety treatment programmes. Reducing social anxiety in individuals is a main part of any clinical intervention. Third, the findings of the current study suggest that health professionals should encourage obese individuals with social anxiety to reassure their value and abilities regardless of their weight or body shape, and assist them to recognize that everybody is unique and that differences between individuals are valuable.”

This will take more than simply telling people with overweight to be more active. It will certainly require targeted and professional help to overcome body dissatisfaction and low self esteem.

Or, even better, we need to do all we can to help people gain more confidence and be accepting about their own bodies in the first place.

@DrSharma
Vancouver, BC

ResearchBlogging.orgAbdollahi A, & Talib MA (2014). Sedentary behaviour and social anxiety in obese individuals: the mediating role of body esteem. Psychology, health & medicine, 1-5 PMID: 24922119

 

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Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Time To Go Nuts About Nuts?

sharma-obesity-nutsNuts are reportedly chock full of all kinds of nutrients and are probably among the healthiest of snacks. However, they are also among the most calorie-dense foods – a small handful of nuts (~30 g) can easily add up to 150-200 cals.

So, do high consumers of nuts run the risk of weight gain?

This issue is discussed in depth by Sze Yen Tan and colleagues in a paper published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, in which they review the effects of nuts on appetite, food intake, metabolism, and body weight.

While eating nuts may not exactly lead to weight loss, most studies find that consumption of “extra” calories as nuts leads to substantially less weight gain than may be expected based on their caloric content.

Their review reflect a number of ways in which nuts may have this effect:

Effect on hunger and appetite:

“…nut ingestion suppresses hunger and desire to eat and promotes fullness. These sensations may aid dietary compensation that offsets much of the energy contributed by nuts. However, strong compensation can also occur independently of reported appetitive effects. This may reflect imprecision in appetite measurement or a truly independent uncharacterized mechanism.”

Mastication (chewing):

“Nuts require considerable oral processing effort and this may, in part, account for the often-noted less-than-predicted effect of their consumption on body weight. The mechanical act of chewing reportedly generates satiation signals through cognitive, neural, endocrine, and physical (eg, gastric emptying) mechanisms; augments cephalic phase responses linked to appetite; influences digestion efficiency; modestly increases energy expenditure; and elicits dietary compensation.”

Nutrient absorption:

“A number of studies have evaluated the efficiency of energy absorption from ground and tree nuts through feeding trials. All showed substantive increases in fecal fat loss with nut consumption, although the values ranged widely from ∼5% to >20%”

Energy expenditure:

“Collectively, there is some evidence that nut consumption increases thermogenesis, but the data are not robust and there is no clear mechanism. One possibility is that the lipid from nuts is absorbed over a prolonged period of time, leading to a small but sustained source of substrate that fuels thermogenesis and could appear as an increase in REE.”

Fat metabolism:

“It has been proposed that nut consumption elevates fat oxidation and preferentially reduces body fat mass, especially in the viscera. These actions are attributed to their high unsaturated fat content….Human studies incorporating different nuts into the diet at realistic doses are needed to determine the effect of nut consumption on body composition.”

With regard to impact on body weight, the authors reach the following conclusions:

Adding nuts to habitual diets:

“Although there are reports of small, but significant increases in body weight with nut consumption, the preponderance of evidence indicates that under controlled or free-living situations, nut consumption does not promote weight gain.”

Eating nuts in calorie-restricted diets:

“The inclusion of nuts in energy-restriction regimens does not impede weight loss. In several trials in which nuts did not augment weight loss, there was a reduction in cardiovascular disease risk indexes in the nut-consuming groups, suggesting that such benefits derive from properties of the nuts rather than just weight change.”

Eating nuts in weight maintenance:

“Several studies assessing the role of nut consumption in weight-maintenance programs have noted a decrease in body weight from baseline. Whether this is due to a greater thermic effect of food or REE effect of the nuts compared with the foods they displaced in the diet has not been established. Nevertheless, current data indicate that the inclusion of nuts in a weight-maintenance program will not lead to weight gain and may aid weight loss.”

Thus, in summary, the authors conclude that,

“…evidence indicates that they pose little challenge to and may even aid weight management. This is attributable to the strong dietary compensation effects they elicit, inefficiency in the absorption of the energy they provide, and possibly an elevation of energy expenditure and fat oxidation.”

As a general caveat to all of these data, it needs to be noted that results varied widely depending on the types of nuts and how exactly these nuts were consumed (e.g. as snacks or added to meals – the former often being more favourable than the latter).

Also, many of the studies had relatively small number of participants and were of rather short duration.

Nevertheless, it does appear that going nuts about nuts may not be quite as detrimental to your weight as their energy content would suggest.

@DrSharma
Toronto, ON

ResearchBlogging.orgTan SY, Dhillon J, & Mattes RD (2014). A review of the effects of nuts on appetite, food intake, metabolism, and body weight. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 100 (Supplement 1) PMID: 24920033

 

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In The News

Diabetics in most need of bariatric surgery, university study finds

Oct. 18, 2013 – Ottawa Citizen: "Encouraging more men to consider bariatric surgery is also important, since it's the best treatment and can stop diabetic patients from needing insulin, said Dr. Arya Sharma, chair in obesity research and management at the University of Alberta." Read article

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