Thursday, August 28, 2014

Call For Abstracts: Canadian Obesity Summit, Toronto, April 28-May 2, 2015

COS2015 toronto callBuilding on the resounding success of Kananaskis, Montreal and Vancouver, the biennial Canadian Obesity Summit is now setting its sights on Toronto.

If you have a professional interest in obesity, it’s your #1 destination for learning, sharing and networking with experts from across Canada around the world.

In 2015, the Canadian Obesity Network (CON-RCO) and the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons (CABPS) are combining resources to hold their scientific meetings under one roof.

The 4th Canadian Obesity Summit (#COS2015) will provide the latest information on obesity research, prevention and management to scientists, health care practitioners, policy makers, partner organizations and industry stakeholders working to reduce the social, mental and physical burden of obesity on Canadians.

The COS 2015 program will include plenary presentations, original scientific oral and poster presentations, interactive workshops and a large exhibit hall. Most importantly, COS 2015 will provide ample opportunity for networking and knowledge exchange for anyone with a professional interest in this field.

Abstract submission is now open – click here

Key Dates

  • Abstract submission deadline: October 23, 2014
  • Notification of abstract review: January 8, 2014
  • Early registration deadline: March 5, 2015

For exhibitor and sponsorship information – click here

To join the Canadian Obesity Network – click here

I look forward to seeing you in Toronto next year!

@DrSharma
Montreal, QC

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)


Friday, August 1, 2014

The 5As of Healthy Pregnancy Weight Gain

5AsPregnancy_PractitionerGuide_rf-final_Page_01Yesterday, the Canadian Obesity Network released the 5As of Healthy Pregnancy Weight Gain.

This follows the release of the 5As of Obesity Management (adults) and the 5As of Pediatric Weight Management.

The 5As of Health Pregnancy Weight Gain, was developed by a working group of nurses, midwives, primary care physicians, obstetricians, researchers and policy makers convened by the Network.

It is based on the best available evidence on this topic and is intended to help primary care practitioners discuss and manage gestational weight with their patients.

The 5As of Healthy Pregnancy Weight Gain is based on the following 5 key principles:

  • Discussion about gestational weight gain should occur with every pregnant women and with every woman planning a pregnancy.

  • Achieving healthy gestational weight gain is about improving the health and well-being of both mothers and babies.

  • Early action means addressing root causes and removing roadblocks.

  • Pregnancy related health beliefs can be powerful influences on weight gain in pregnancy.

  • Achieving goals is different for every woman.

The 5As of Health Pregnancy Weight Gain can be downloaded here – pdfppt

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

p.s. if you did not receive the Obesity Network Newsletter with this announcement due to Canada’s new anti-spam legislation, please click here.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (2 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)


Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Prebiotic Fibre Alters Mother Milk and Offspring Gut Bacteria in Rats

sharma-obesity-suckling-rat1With all the attention to the role of gut microbiota and the ongoing debate as to the role of breast feeding in obesity prevention, a study by Raylene Reimer and colleagues from the University of Calgary adds an interesting spin.

Their study, now published in OBESITY shows that feeding female rat a diet high in prebiotic fibre (21.6% wt/wt) throughout pregnancy and lactation, compared to a control or high-protien (40% wt/wt) diet, results in a lower oligosaccharide content of the milk with a higher content of bifidobacteria in the offspring.

Although this did not lead to any marked differences in body composition or other metabolic parameters, the study proves the point that (at least in rats) maternal diet can affect the composition of gut bacteria in the offspring (which may or may not have metabolic benefits).

There is no reason to believe that in humans maternal nutrition may well impart a similar influence via breast feeding on the microbiota of infants.

This certainly sounds like a promising field for future research.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgHallam MC, Barile D, Meyrand M, German JB, & Reimer RA (2014). Maternal high protein or prebiotic fiber diets affect maternal milk composition and gut microbiota in rat dams and their offspring. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) PMID: 25056822

.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)


Friday, July 18, 2014

Birth Control And Obesity

sharma-obesity-birth-control-pillAlthough obesity is a well-recognised factor for female infertility, the vast majority of women with excess weight are probably more interested in effective birth control.

That this is not as simple as it seems is evident from an article by Sheila Mody and Michelle Han from the University of California, San Diego, published in Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecaology.

The paper succinctly reviews a wide range of issues related to birth control and obesity.

To begin with, the authors points out that unintended pregnancies in obese women are often a problem simply because obese women are far less likely to use effective contraception than non-obese women. This non-use may in part be attributable to fear of weight gain, when most studies show that modern hormonal contraception is associated with almost no weight gain. The exception appears to be depot-medroxyprogesterone (DMPA), which may cause about 5 lb weight gain in the first year of use.

As for efficacy, the data show that unintended pregnancy rates among overweight women using oral contraceptives are similar or slightly higher than that among nonoverweight women. The reasons for these higher rates are not exactly clear.

Fortunately, the efficacy of intrauterine devices (IUD) appear no different between obese and non-obese women although the insertion of an IUD maybe more difficult in obese women because of poor visualization of the cervix and limited assessment of uterine position (a problem that can often be solved with the help of an ultrasound).

The paper also discusses the suitability of the vaginal vaginal contraceptive ring, which has been hypothesized to offer higher hormone levels for obese women than oral contraceptives because the hormones are absorbed directly into the vaginal mucosa and do not go through the first- pass liver metabolism.

Finally, the paper discusses issues around contraception for women who have undergone bariatric surgery (who have a particularly high rate of unintended pregnancies) as well as best practices for emergency contraception.

This is clearly information that all clinicians who counsel obese women should be aware of.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgMody SK, & Han M (2014). Obesity and Contraception. Clinical obstetrics and gynecology PMID: 25029338

 

.

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)


Wednesday, June 18, 2014

4th Canadian Obesity student Meeting (COSM 2014)

Uwaterloo_sealOver the next three days, I will be in Waterloo, Ontario, attending the 4th biennial Canadian Obesity Student Meeting (COSM 2014), a rather unique capacity building event organised by the Canadian Obesity Network’s Students and New Professionals (CON-SNP).

CON-SNP consist of an extensive network within CON, comprising of over 1000 trainees organised in about 30 chapters at universities and colleges across Canada.

Students and trainees in this network come from a wide range of backgrounds and span faculties and research interests as diverse as molecular genetics and public health, kinesiology and bariatric surgery, education and marketing, or energy metabolism and ingestive behaviour.

Over the past eight years, since the 1st COSM was hosted by laval university in Quebec, these meetings have been attended by over 600 students, most presenting their original research work, often for the first time to an audience of peers.

Indeed, it is the peer-led nature of this meeting that makes it so unique. COSM is entirely organised by CON-SNP – the students select the site, book the venues, review the abstracts, design the program, chair the sessions, and lead the discussions.

Although a few senior faculty are invited, they are largely observers, at best participating in discussions and giving the odd plenary lecture. But 85% of the program is delivered by the trainees themselves.

Apart from the sheer pleasure of sharing in the excitement of the participants, it has been particularly rewarding to follow the careers of many of the trainees who attended the first COSMs – many now themselves hold faculty positions and have trainees of their own.

As my readers are well aware, I regularly attend professional meetings around the world – none match the excitement and intensity of COSM.

I look forward to another succesful meeting as we continue to build the next generation of Canadian obesity researchers, health professionals and policy makers.

You can follow live tweets from this meeting at #COSM2014

@DrSharma
Waterloo, Ontario

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)

In The News

Diabetics in most need of bariatric surgery, university study finds

Oct. 18, 2013 – Ottawa Citizen: "Encouraging more men to consider bariatric surgery is also important, since it's the best treatment and can stop diabetic patients from needing insulin, said Dr. Arya Sharma, chair in obesity research and management at the University of Alberta." Read article

» More news articles...

Publications

  • Subscribe via Email

    Enter your email address:

    Delivered by FeedBurner




  • Arya Mitra Sharma
  • Disclaimer

    Postings on this blog represent the personal views of Dr. Arya M. Sharma. They are not representative of or endorsed by Alberta Health Services or the Weight Wise Program.
  • Archives

     

  • RSS Weighty Matters

  • Click for related posts

  • Disclaimer

    Medical information and privacy
    Any medical discussion on this page is intended to be of a general nature only. This page is not designed to give specific medical advice. If you have a medical problem you should consult your own physician for advice specific to your own situation.


  • Meta

  • Obesity Links

  • If you have benefitted from the information on this site, please take a minute to donate to its maintenance.

  • Home | News | KOL | Media | Publications | Trainees | About
    Copyright 2008–2014 Dr. Arya Sharma, All rights reserved.
    Blog Widget by LinkWithin