Friday, October 24, 2014

Social Network Analysis of the Obesity Research Boot Camp

bootcamp_pin_finalRegular readers may recall that for the past nine years, I have had the privilege and pleasure of serving as faculty of the Canadian Obesity Network’s annual Obesity Research Summer Bootcamp.

The camp is open to a select group of graduate and post-graduate trainees from a wide range of disciplines with an interest in obesity research. Over nine days, the trainees are mentored and have a chance to learn about obesity research in areas ranging from basic science to epidemiology and childhood obesity to health policy.

Now, a formal network analysis of bootcamp attendees, published by Jenny Godley and colleagues in the Journal of Interdisciplinary Healthcare, documents the substantial impact that this camp has on the careers of the trainees.

As the analysis of trainees who attended this camp over its first 5 years of operation (2006-2010) shows, camp attendance had a profound positive impact on their career development, particularly in terms of establishing contacts and professional relationships.

Thus, both the quantitative and the qualitative results demonstrate the importance of interdisciplinary training and relationships for career development in obesity researcher (and possibly beyond).

Personally, participation at this camp has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my career and I look forward to continuing this annual exercise for years to come.

To apply for the 2015 Bootcamp, which is also open to international trainees – click here.

@DrSharma
Toronto, ON

ResearchBlogging.orgGodley J, Glenn NM, Sharma AM, & Spence JC (2014). Networks of trainees: examining the effects of attending an interdisciplinary research training camp on the careers of new obesity scholars. Journal of multidisciplinary healthcare, 7, 459-70 PMID: 25336965

 

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Tuesday, October 7, 2014

The Freshmen 15 Are Neither 15 Nor Limited to Freshmen

sharma-obesity-black-studentsAccording to popular belief, the first year of college can be associated with a 15 pound weight gain – often referred to as “the freshman 15″.

Now, a study by Micheal Fedewa and colleagues from the University of Georgia, look at the weight trajectory in college studies in a paper published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Their systematic review and meta-analysis includes 49 studies evaluating the effect of the first year of college (and beyond) on the dependent body weight and or %body fat.

While the researchers found a statistically significant change in body weight among students, the average weight gain was a rather modest 1.6 kg during a typical 4-year college career. Interestingly, this finding is similar to previous estimates suggesting average increases ranging from 1.1. to 2.1 kg in the first year of college.

Thus, the actual average weight gain comes nowhere close to the notorious “15”.

Also, the authors found that most of the weight gain is progressive and continues throughout college – there is little evidence that most of the weight gained (if any) happens in the first year.

Thus, despite individual anecdotal experiences of weight gain, that may sometimes approach or even exceed 15 lbs, there is little scientific basis or reason for concern about the freshman 15.

Or, as the authors put it,

These results suggest that the “Freshman 15” may not pose a significant risk to students’ health, but unhealthy behaviors throughout college may lead to unfavorable changes in body weight, as weight change does not appear to stabilize as previously reported.

Perhaps it is time to put this idea to rest and move on to study issues that may be more important than this.

@DrSharma
Guelph, ON

ResearchBlogging.orgFedewa MV, Das BM, Evans EM, & Dishman RK (2014). Change in Weight and Adiposity in College Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. American journal of preventive medicine PMID: 25241201

 

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Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Practical Guide To Obesity Prevention in Schools in Developing Countries

Practical Guide To Obesity Prevention in School-Aged ChildrenObesity in school-age children is not just a problem in the affluent West – this issue if of growing importance in countries where one may not quite expect this to be an issue like South Asia or Africa.

Now, researchers from the University of Montreal and McGill University have released a comprehensive practical guide to developing and implementing obesity prevention programs for school-aged children and adolescents in developing countries.

As the authors discuss,

“What is most challenging in low and middle-income countries is the urgency of preventing obesity while also tackling the problem of malnutrition. Again, the school setting is likely the most appropriate to address the dual burden of malnutrition, but interventions are needed at different stages of the lifecycle, beginning with girls, in order to break the intergenerational cycle of malnutrition and its impact on vulnerability to obesity and other chronic diseases.”

This guide is a product of TRANSNUT (for nutrition transition), a WHO Collaborating Centre comprised of 10 researchers from the Department of Nutrition and other units of the University of Montréal.

In the words of the authors,

“This manual is designed to provide a hands-on guide for health and nutrition professionals to plan, implement and evaluate obesity prevention programmes for school-age children and adolescents in developing countries, particularly in the school setting. Several practical tools are suggested, including for the assessment of obesity and of its proximal determinants, that is, eating and physical activity patterns. Models and conceptual frameworks are discussed because action has to be grounded in sound theory. We provide a 5-step guide to planning healthy nutrition promotion and obesity prevention interventions, which we adapted from the PRECEDE-PROCEED of Green. The steps consist of community and individual assessments, identification of targets for change(community, family, individual level), choice of objectives, design of programme methods, and procedures for theevaluation. In order to foster effective programmes to promote healthy nutrition and lifestyle among school-agechildren and adolescents, we discuss theoretical models of behaviours change that may be appropriate (Health Belief Model, Theory of Planned Behaviour, Social Cognitive Theory, Stages of Change, Transtheoretical Model).”

This document should provide an interesting read to anyone interested in the prevention of childhood obesity in developing countries or elsewhere.

A copy of this guide can be downloaded here

@DrSharma
Charlottetown, PEI

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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

5th Conference on Childhood and Adolescent Obesity, Winnipeg, Sept 23-26, 2014

The next couple of days, I will be attending the 5th Conference on Childhood and Adolescent Obesity in Winnipeg.

For a previous post on this conference and a copy of the program, click here.

For tickets to the Dr. Sharma Show in Winnipeg on September 24th, click here.

@DrSharma
Winnipeg, MB

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Thursday, August 28, 2014

Call For Abstracts: Canadian Obesity Summit, Toronto, April 28-May 2, 2015

COS2015 toronto callBuilding on the resounding success of Kananaskis, Montreal and Vancouver, the biennial Canadian Obesity Summit is now setting its sights on Toronto.

If you have a professional interest in obesity, it’s your #1 destination for learning, sharing and networking with experts from across Canada around the world.

In 2015, the Canadian Obesity Network (CON-RCO) and the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons (CABPS) are combining resources to hold their scientific meetings under one roof.

The 4th Canadian Obesity Summit (#COS2015) will provide the latest information on obesity research, prevention and management to scientists, health care practitioners, policy makers, partner organizations and industry stakeholders working to reduce the social, mental and physical burden of obesity on Canadians.

The COS 2015 program will include plenary presentations, original scientific oral and poster presentations, interactive workshops and a large exhibit hall. Most importantly, COS 2015 will provide ample opportunity for networking and knowledge exchange for anyone with a professional interest in this field.

Abstract submission is now open – click here

Key Dates

  • Abstract submission deadline: October 23, 2014
  • Notification of abstract review: January 8, 2014
  • Early registration deadline: March 5, 2015

For exhibitor and sponsorship information – click here

To join the Canadian Obesity Network – click here

I look forward to seeing you in Toronto next year!

@DrSharma
Montreal, QC

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In The News

Diabetics in most need of bariatric surgery, university study finds

Oct. 18, 2013 – Ottawa Citizen: "Encouraging more men to consider bariatric surgery is also important, since it's the best treatment and can stop diabetic patients from needing insulin, said Dr. Arya Sharma, chair in obesity research and management at the University of Alberta." Read article

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