Thursday, August 28, 2014

Call For Abstracts: Canadian Obesity Summit, Toronto, April 28-May 2, 2015

COS2015 toronto callBuilding on the resounding success of Kananaskis, Montreal and Vancouver, the biennial Canadian Obesity Summit is now setting its sights on Toronto.

If you have a professional interest in obesity, it’s your #1 destination for learning, sharing and networking with experts from across Canada around the world.

In 2015, the Canadian Obesity Network (CON-RCO) and the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons (CABPS) are combining resources to hold their scientific meetings under one roof.

The 4th Canadian Obesity Summit (#COS2015) will provide the latest information on obesity research, prevention and management to scientists, health care practitioners, policy makers, partner organizations and industry stakeholders working to reduce the social, mental and physical burden of obesity on Canadians.

The COS 2015 program will include plenary presentations, original scientific oral and poster presentations, interactive workshops and a large exhibit hall. Most importantly, COS 2015 will provide ample opportunity for networking and knowledge exchange for anyone with a professional interest in this field.

Abstract submission is now open – click here

Key Dates

  • Abstract submission deadline: October 23, 2014
  • Notification of abstract review: January 8, 2014
  • Early registration deadline: March 5, 2015

For exhibitor and sponsorship information – click here

To join the Canadian Obesity Network – click here

I look forward to seeing you in Toronto next year!

@DrSharma
Montreal, QC

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)


Friday, August 8, 2014

Healthy Obesity: More Questions Than Answers?

sharma-obesity-visceral-fat-mriRegular readers will be well aware of the evidence that a subset of people living with obesity can be remarkably healthy despite carrying a rather large amount of body fat.

This issue of “healthy obesity” was the topic of the 13th Stock Conference of the International Association of the Study of Obesity, the proceeding of which are now published in Obesity Reviews.

As the authors note,

“The ‘healthy obese’ phenotype was described in the 1980s, but major advancements in its characterization were only made in the past five years. During this time, several new mechanisms that may be involved in health preservation in obesity were proposed through the use of transgenic animal models, use of sophisticated imaging techniques and in vivo measurements of insulin sensitivity. However, the main obstacle in advancing our understanding of the metabolically healthy obese phenotype and its related long-term health risks is the lack of a standardized definition.”

The latter is a real problem because finding people with obesity, who are truly metabolically and otherwise healthy becomes harder the higher the BMI gets – this makes the study of this phenomenon rather challenging.

Nevertheless,

“One of the most consistent characteristics of metabolic health in obesity across studies in humans is reduced liver lipid. This is likely the consequence of increased capacity for storing fat coupled with improved mitochondrial function in adipose tissue and decreased de novo lipogenesis in liver. This can also result in decreased deposition of lipids, including bioactive species, in skeletal muscle. Decreased adipose tissue inflammation with decreased macrophages and a unique T-cell signature with an anti-inflammatory circulating milieu were also suggested to characterize metabolic health in obesity. Anecdotal data support a possible role for healthier lifestyle, including increased level of physical activity and healthier diet. It remains to be established whether a favourable metagenomic signature is a characteristic of metabolic health in obesity.”

Finland’s, Dr Kirsi Pietiläinen explained that,

“..three energy dissipation pathways, oxidative phosphorylation, fat oxidation and amino acid catabolism showed preserved pathway activities in subjects who are MHO at a level similar to their lean counterparts. In contrast, these pathways were significantly down-regulated in adipose samples from obese twins with metabolic disturbances. Another potential hallmark of metabolic health, a favourable inflammatory profile of the adipose tissue was also observed in the MHO twins. Also, the fat cells of the MHO twins were smaller with evidence of more active differentiation processes within the fat tissue. As multiple mitochondrial pathways are vital in adipocyte differentiation [29], it is possible that mitochondrial malfunction impairs the development of new fat cells, which in turn results in an inability of the adipose tissue to expand under conditions of energy excess. This failure of fat cell proliferation has long been suspected to constitute the framework for ectopic fat storage, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.”

Other speakers discussed other aspects including immune function and microbiata in this phenomenon.

Finally, the authors concluded that,

“identifying underlying factors and mechanisms associated with this phenotype will eventually be invaluable in helping the scientific and medical community understand factors that predispose, delay or protect obese individuals from metabolic disturbances. It is essential to underscore that the MHO concept presently only address the cardio-metabolic risks associated with obesity; it is therefore important that patients who are MHO are still very likely to present many other obesity-related complications such as altered physical and/or physiological functional status, sleep problems, articulation and postural problems, stigma, etc. Importantly, the MHO concept supports the fact that classification based on excess adiposity per se (e.g. BMI or body composition if available) should be supplemented with obesity-related comorbidities, e.g. with fasting insulin as proposed by the Edmonton obesity classification system.”

Certainly a space to watch as we learn more and more about the “healthy obesity” phenotype.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgSamocha-Bonet D, Dixit VD, Kahn CR, Leibel RL, Lin X, Nieuwdorp M, Pietiläinen KH, Rabasa-Lhoret R, Roden M, Scherer PE, Klein S, & Ravussin E (2014). Metabolically healthy and unhealthy obese – the 2013 Stock Conference report. Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity PMID: 25059108

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)


Wednesday, July 23, 2014

In Memorium: Albert (Mickey) J Stunkard

Stunkard twinsAs I spend my days at the 9th Canadian Obesity Network’s Summer Bootcamp for young trainees from Canada and around the world, I was saddened to learn of the passing of Mickey Stunkard, clearly one of the biggest names in obesity research – at a healthy age of 92.

With well over 500 publications to his name, Mickey is perhaps best known for his twin studies showing that the body weight of adopted identical twins reared apart resembles each other and that of their biological parents rather than the weight of their adoptive parents.

This work helped establish the basis for much of the genetic work on obesity that followed, clearly showing that differences in body weight between two individuals are much more accounted for by their difference in genetics than by differences in their “lifestyles”.

These findings were often misused in “nature vs. nurture” debates, an issue that serious scientists have long laid to rest in light of our current understanding that the two cannot be discussed separately, simply because genes and lifestyle interact on virtually every level – from molecules, to cells, to behaviours.

Here is what one obituary had to say about Mickey:

“He surveyed obesity treatment studies in the late ’50s and found that the nation’s diet programs could claim only a 2 percent success rate. He was an early advocate for the use of bariatric surgery to induce weight loss. He also published the first modern account of binge eating in obese individuals.”

I have had to pleasure to often hear him speak at conferences.

He will be dearly remembered.

@DrSharma
Kananaskis, AB

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (2 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 2 votes)


Wednesday, June 18, 2014

4th Canadian Obesity student Meeting (COSM 2014)

Uwaterloo_sealOver the next three days, I will be in Waterloo, Ontario, attending the 4th biennial Canadian Obesity Student Meeting (COSM 2014), a rather unique capacity building event organised by the Canadian Obesity Network’s Students and New Professionals (CON-SNP).

CON-SNP consist of an extensive network within CON, comprising of over 1000 trainees organised in about 30 chapters at universities and colleges across Canada.

Students and trainees in this network come from a wide range of backgrounds and span faculties and research interests as diverse as molecular genetics and public health, kinesiology and bariatric surgery, education and marketing, or energy metabolism and ingestive behaviour.

Over the past eight years, since the 1st COSM was hosted by laval university in Quebec, these meetings have been attended by over 600 students, most presenting their original research work, often for the first time to an audience of peers.

Indeed, it is the peer-led nature of this meeting that makes it so unique. COSM is entirely organised by CON-SNP – the students select the site, book the venues, review the abstracts, design the program, chair the sessions, and lead the discussions.

Although a few senior faculty are invited, they are largely observers, at best participating in discussions and giving the odd plenary lecture. But 85% of the program is delivered by the trainees themselves.

Apart from the sheer pleasure of sharing in the excitement of the participants, it has been particularly rewarding to follow the careers of many of the trainees who attended the first COSMs – many now themselves hold faculty positions and have trainees of their own.

As my readers are well aware, I regularly attend professional meetings around the world – none match the excitement and intensity of COSM.

I look forward to another succesful meeting as we continue to build the next generation of Canadian obesity researchers, health professionals and policy makers.

You can follow live tweets from this meeting at #COSM2014

@DrSharma
Waterloo, Ontario

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)


Friday, May 9, 2014

Obesity Is Highly Heritable – But Exactly How This Works Remains Mysterious

sharma-obesity-dna_molecule9One of the most fascinating aspects of obesity is that it is virtually as heritable as body height.

Yet, the hunt for the genes that determine body weight has been slow and we are probably not all that much closer to fully understanding exactly how genes influence body weight, than we were 20 years ago, when I myself was dabbling in genetic studies of complex diseases.

An article by the science writer Cassandra Willyard from Madison, Wisconsin, published in the Nature Outlook Supplement on Obesity does a valiant job of explaining where we currently stand in our understanding of the genetics of obesity.

The article discusses the contribution of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), which have linked about 75 genetic variants have to obesity.

“But GWAS studies aren’t perfect. They can lead researchers to important parts of the genome, but it can be difficult to sort out which gene within that region might be the culprit.”

Indeed, it appears that the conventional notion that much of the heritability of obesity would be explained by common genetic variants may be wrong.

Another possibility could well be that current GWAS studies don’t gene-environment interactions into account. Genes that influence body weight only under certain conditions, cannot be identified in the current studies as environmental exposure of individuals has not been well characterized in these studies.

“To resolve the issue, more than a hundred researchers launched a meta-analysis that included 45 studies involving more than 218,000 adults and 19,000 children. Not surprisingly, they found that people who carry the susceptibility gene had a higher risk of obesity. However, the researchers also observed that the risk appears to be reduced in people who are physically active.”

Another possibility may well be that obesity is not determined by common variants but rather by a large number of rare variants in the population (present in less than 5% of individuals, i.e. below the threshold of GWAS analyses).

The article also describes the additional complexity added by the recent work on epigenetics which, of e.g.

…”suggest that what happens in the womb can cause lasting changes in gene expression and influence disease risk even in adulthood, a concept known as fetal programming. This raises the possibility that a mother’s experiences during pregnancy — such as malnutrition — can influence the next generation.”

“The epigenetics of obesity isn’t only about the mother — the father’s experiences can have an impact too. When researchers in Australia fed male rats a fatty diet, the rats — as expected — put on weight and developed signs of diabetes. But, surprisingly, the weight gain also seemed to affect the rats’ daughters: the female offspring had trouble controlling their insulin levels despite being on a normal diet. And a study published in 2013 showed that children with obese fathers had less methylation on a particular region of the IGF2 gene than children who were born to lean fathers.”

As Wollyard explains,

“To show that an epigenetic change is due to inheritance, however, researchers have to look at multiple generations. When a pregnant woman experiences malnutrition or some other environmental stress, three are directly exposed…So, if a woman’s great grandchildren show a particular epigenetic change that is linked to environmental stress during their great grandmother’s pregnancy, that change can be said to be inherited rather than being a programming effect.”

But exactly what role transgenerational transmission of “acquired” genetic changes play in obesity remains unclear. Nevertheless, there is the distinct possibility that this type of inheritance may explain some of the missing heritability.

All we can say, is that there is a considerable likelihood that our genes may well have changed.

@DrSharma
Toronto, ON

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

In The News

Diabetics in most need of bariatric surgery, university study finds

Oct. 18, 2013 – Ottawa Citizen: "Encouraging more men to consider bariatric surgery is also important, since it's the best treatment and can stop diabetic patients from needing insulin, said Dr. Arya Sharma, chair in obesity research and management at the University of Alberta." Read article

» More news articles...

Publications

"Quantitative phase-contrast imaging through a scattering media."

» Browse and download more journal publications...

Watch Dr. Sharma in the News!

Dr. Sharma - NEWS Videos

Listen to Dr. Sharma!

Dr. Sharma - on CBC.ca

Watch Dr. Sharma on Listen Up


  • Subscribe via Email

    Enter your email address:

    Delivered by FeedBurner




  • Arya Mitra Sharma
  • Disclaimer

    Postings on this blog represent the personal views of Dr. Arya M. Sharma. They are not representative of or endorsed by Alberta Health Services or the Weight Wise Program.
  • Archives

     

  • RSS Weighty Matters

  • Click for related posts

  • Disclaimer

    Medical information and privacy
    Any medical discussion on this page is intended to be of a general nature only. This page is not designed to give specific medical advice. If you have a medical problem you should consult your own physician for advice specific to your own situation.


  • Meta

  • Obesity Links

  • If you have benefitted from the information on this site, please take a minute to donate to its maintenance.

  • Home | News | KOL | Media | Publications | Trainees | About
    Copyright 2008–2014 Dr. Arya Sharma, All rights reserved.
    Blog Widget by LinkWithin