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Measuring Body Composition in Research and Clinical Practice

Screen Shot 2016-05-29 at 9.03.11 PMWe all know that BMI is not a good measure of body fat. In fact, all anthropometric measurements (waist circumference, skin-fold thickness, etc.) have important limitations when applied to individuals.

Currently, the two most common clinical approaches to measuring body composition are measuring bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

But just how practical and reliable are these methods in clinical or research settings when applied to individuals with higher BMI levels?

This is the subject of a review article by Carlene Johnson Stoklossa and colleagues from the University of Alberta, published in Current Obesity Reports.

The researchers looked at 12 studies that applied these methods to individuals with a BMI of 35 or greater.

Largely because of its sensitivity to fluid balance, BIA overestimated fat-free mass with scaling errors as BMI increased.

In contrast, DXA provided accurate and reliable body composition measures, but equipment-related barriers prevented assessment of some taller, wider, and heavier subjects.

From these findings, the authors conclude that BIA must be regarded as a largely unreliable method to assess body composition in individuals with class II/III obesity.

In contrast, DXA, although reliable, will likely need some technological improvements that will allow more inclusive testing of taller and larger individuals.

What exactly, clinicians are to do with this information or how such measurements can potentially improve obesity care remains to be determined.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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5th Canadian Obesity Summit – Call For Abstracts And Workshops Now Open

banff-springs-hotelEvery two years the Canadian Obesity Network holds its National Obesity Summit – the only national obesity meeting in Canada covering all aspects of obesity – from basic and population science to prevention and health promotion to clinical management and health policy.

Anyone who has been to one of the past four Summits has experienced the cross-disciplinary networking and breaking down of silos (the Network takes networking very seriously).

Of all the scientific meetings I go to around the world, none has quite the informal and personal feel of the Canadian Obesity Summit – despite all differences in interests and backgrounds, everyone who attends is part of the same community – working on different pieces of the puzzle that only makes sense when it all fits together in the end.

The 5th Canadian Obesity Summit will be held at the Banff Springs Hotel in Banff National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, located in the heart of the Canadian Rockies (which in itself should make it worth attending the summit), April 25-29, 2017.

Yesterday, the call went out for abstracts and workshops – the latter an opportunity for a wide range of special interest groups to meet and discuss their findings (the last Summit featured over 20 separate workshops – perhaps a tad too many, which is why the program committee will be far more selective this time around).

So here is what the program committee is looking for:

  • Basic science – cellular, molecular, physiological or neuronal related aspects of obesity
  • Epidemiology – epidemiological techniques/methods to address obesity related questions in populations studies
  • Prevention of obesity and health promotion interventions – research targeting different populations, settings, and intervention levels (e.g. community-based, school, workplace, health systems, and policy)
  • Weight bias and weight-based discrimination – including prevalence studies as well as interventions to reduce weight bias and weight-based discrimination; both qualitative and quantitative studies
  • Pregnancy and maternal health – studies across clinical, health services and population health themes
  • Childhood and adolescent obesity – research conducted with children and or adolescents and reports on the correlates, causes and consequences of pediatric obesity as well as interventions for treatment and prevention.
  • Obesity in adults and older adults – prevalence studies and interventions to address obesity in these populations
  • Health services and policy research – reaserch addressing issues related to obesity management services which idenitfy the most effective ways to organize, manage, finance, and deliver high quality are, reduce medical errors or improve patient safety
  • Bariatric surgery – issues that are relevant to metabolic or weight loss surgery
  • Clinical management – clinical management of overweight and obesity across the life span (infants through to older adults) including interventions for prevention and treatment of obesity and weight-related comorbidities
  • Rehabilitation –  investigations that explore opportunities for engagement in meaningful and health-building occupations for people with obesity
  • Diversity – studies that are relevant to diverse or underrepresented populations
  • eHealth/mHealth – research that incorporates social media, internet and/or mobile devices in prevention and treatment
  • Cancer – research relevant to obesity and cancer

…..and of course anything else related to obesity.

Deadline for submission is October 24, 2016

To submit an abstract or workshop – click here

For more information on the 5th Canadian Obesity Summit – click here

For sponsorship opportunities – click here

Looking forward to seeing you in Banff next year!

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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Arguments For Calling Obesity A Disease #5: Access To Care

sharma-obesity-doctor-kidContinuing in my miniseries on arguments in favour of calling obesity (defined as excess or abnormal fat tissue that impairs health) a disease, I turn to the perhaps most important reason of all – access to care.

Currently, few health care systems feel obliged to provide individuals presenting with obesity treatment for their condition (beyond a few words of caution and simplistic advise to simply eat less and move more).

Most health plans do not cover treatments for obesity, arguing that this is simply a lifestyle issue.

In some countries (e.g. Germany), health insurance and health benefit plans are expressly forbidden by law to cover medical treatments for obesity.

Although long established as the only evidence-based effective long-term treatment for severe obesity, many jurisdictions continue to woefully underprovide access to bariatric surgery, with currently less than 4 out of 1,000 eligible patients receiving surgery per year in Canada.

Pretty much all of this can be blamed on one issue alone – the notion that obesity is simply a matter or personal choice and can be remediated by simple lifestyle change.

Declaring obesity a disease can potentially change all of this.

As a disease in its own right, health care systems can no longer refuse to provide treatments for this condition.

In the same manner that no health system or insurance plan can refuse to cover treatments for diabetes or hypertension, no health system or insurance plan should be able to deny coverage for treatments for obesity.

As a chronic disease, obesity care must now be firmly integrated into chronic disease management programs, in the same manner that these programs provide services to patients with other chronic diseases.

How long will it take before this becomes accepted practice and funding for obesity treatments rises to the level of funding currently available for treating other chronic diseases?

That, is anyone’s guess, but no doubt, declaring obesity a disease finally puts patients living with this condition on an equal footing with patients living with any other chronic disease.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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Arguments Against Obesity As A Disease #9: Its Just A Risk Factor

sharma-obesity-blood-pressure4Next, in my miniseries on arguments I commonly hear against the notion of calling obesity a disease, is that it is “just a risk factor” for other diseases.

This may be true, if you just (wrongly) considered elevated BMI as your definition of obesity, because no doubt, people with higher BMI levels carry a higher risk for obesity related complications including type 2 diabetes, sleep apnea, fatty liver disease, hypertension – just to name a few. (Note that increased risk is not the same as actually having the condition!).

However, when you use the actual WHO definition of obesity, namely, “accumulation of excess or abnormal fat that impairs health”, obesity is no longer just a risk factor – it is now (by definition) impairing your health, which makes it far more than just a risk factor.

So while someone with a BMI of 35 may be at risk of developing obesity (not the same as having it), when their excess fat actually starts impairing their health, it de facto becomes a disease in its own right.

Even then, one might argue that obesity itself is not the disease, rather the complications of obesity are the real disease.

This notion is both right and wrong.

There are many conditions that are both diseases in their own right as well as risk factors for other diseases or complications.

Take type 2 diabetes for instance – it is both a disease in itself but also a risk factor for coronary heart disease or end-stage kidney disease.

Take hypertension – a disease in its own right but also a risk factor for strokes and heart attacks.

Take gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, which is also a risk factor for Barrett’s disease and oesophageal cancer.

Take fatty liver disease, which is also a risk factor for cirrhosis.

Gall bladder stones, which is also a risk factor for pancreatitis.

Multiple sclerosis, which is also a risk factor for neurogenic bladder and pyelonephritis.

The list goes on and on.

So just because obesity is also a risk factor for a wide range of other medical problems, it does not make obesity any less of a disease in its own right.

When excess or abnormal body fat affects health – it’s a disease. When it doesn’t, it’s at best a risk factor.

That, is perhaps a subtle but important distinction.

@DrSharma
Toronto, ON

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Arguments Against Obesity As A Disease #8: Promotes Helplessness And Hopelessness

sharma-obesity-depressionContinuing in my miniseries on arguments I hear against calling obesity a disease, I now discuss the objection, that doing so promotes a sense of helplessness or even hopelessness in people who carry extra weight.

First of all, as noted previously, carrying extra weight is NOT the definition of obesity. For someone to have obesity they need to be carrying weight that is actually due to excess or abnormal fat tissue AND there has to be some negative impact of that fat tissue on their health – otherwise they do not have obesity!.

That said, I am not sure how calling obesity on changes anything in terms of helplessness or hopelessness.

Yes, the effective options to better manage obesity are limited and most people will likely struggle simply not to gain even more weight – but that fact doesn’t change whether you call obesity a disease or not.

Indeed, there are many diseases for which we lack effective treatments (e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis), this does not make any of them any less of a disease.

As for hopelessness, just because you are diagnosed with a chronic disease doesn’t mean everything is hopeless.

In fact, there are many people living with chronic diseases that are controlled and well managed (e.g. diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea), who do just fine (with treatment) and go on to live long and productive lives.

Obviously, we need better treatments for obesity but even without those,  people living with obesity can change the course of their disease by identifying and  addressing the root causes of their weight gain (e.g. depression, PTSD, emotional eating, etc.) and adopting behaviours, which even if not resulting in any noticeable weight loss, can markedly improve their health and well-being.

Again, whether you call obesity a disease or not is completely irrelevant to whether or not you feel helpless or hopeless – the management approach would be the same, except that hopefully it will shift attention to a chronic disease strategy that requires long-term sustainable management rather than an acute intervention that is unsustainable.

If we are serious about providing patients with help and hope, let us get serious about finding and providing better treatments for this disease.

@DrSharma
Toronto. ON

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