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How Precise Can Obesity Medicine Get?

Another article in the 2018 JAMA special issue on obesity is one by Susan and Jack Yanovski and deals with the issue of using a precision or “personalised” approach to obesity prevention and management.

As we know, there are myriad factors that can lead to obesity (environmental, genetic, psychological, medical, etc., etc., etc.), with each patient having their own story and set of drivers and barriers.

Furthermore, we know that for any given treatment (whether behavioural, medical, or surgical) there is wide variation in individual outcomes.

So, being able to match the right treatment to the right patient, or even better, reliably predict a given patient’s response to a specific treatment could potentially improve outcomes and reduce patient burden and costs.

However, as the authors note, currently the only real predictor to treatment response is how well patients respond during the early part of treatment. Thus, we know that patient who lose a significant amount of weight during the first few weeks of medical treatment, tend to have the best long-term success in terms of weight loss.

However, this approach is also rather limited. In my own practice, I regularly see patients, who initially do well with behavioural, medical or surgical treatments, but eventually struggle, as well as patients who take longer to respond to a treatment before ultimately doing fine in the long term.

We are of course a long way off from having any kind of genetic or other testing that would reliably predict patient responses to treatment.

While this may become possible in the future, I am not holding my breath.

Not only is every patient’s story different, but the many factors that can determine response (societal, behavioural, psychological, biological, etc.) are almost endless and, moreover, can even vary over time in a given individual.

In fact, for most complex chronic diseases (e.g. diabetes, hypertension, depression, etc.), finding the best treatment for a given patient continues to be “trial and error”, or in other words, “empirical”.

Despite all the progress in genetic research, this has not really changed for most other complex chronic diseases like hypertension, type 2 diabetes, or dyslipidemia (despite a few rare but notable exceptions).

Moveover, as the authors point out, there are many other factors that will determine whether or not a given patient even has access to certain treatments, irrespective of whether or not that treatment is indeed the best treatment for them.

Currently, the best we can do, is to try to understand the drivers and barriers that each of our patients face and discuss with them the best treatment options available to them given their situation and circumstances.

Whether a more precise approach is ever likely (as the authors hope), clearly remains to be seen, but based on the progress made in for other complex chronic conditions, for which similar approaches have been tried, I am perhaps far less optimistic than the authors.

But, then again, I am happy to be proven wrong.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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The OPQRST Of Body Weight

The assessment of weight history is no doubt a key feature of obesity assessment. Not only can weight history and trajectories provide important insights into obesity related risk but, perhaps more importantly, provide key information on precipitating factors and drivers of excessive weight gain.

Now, in a short article published in MedEdPublish, Robert Kushner discusses how the well-known OPQRST mnemonic for assessing a “chief complaint”  can be applied to assess body weight.

In short, OPQRST is a mnemonic for Onset, Precipitating, Quality of Life, Remedy, Setting, and Temporal pattern. Applied to obesity, Kushner provides the following sample questions for each item:

Onset: “When did you first begin to gain weight?” “What did you weight in high school, college, early 20s, 30s, 40s?” “What was your heaviest weight?”

Precipitating: “What life events led to your weight gain, e.g., college, long commute, marriage, divorce, financial loss?” “How much weight did you gain with pregnancy?” “How much weight did you gain when you stopped smoking?” “How much weight did you gain when you started insulin?”

Quality of life: “At what weight did you feel your best?” “What is hard to do at your current weight?”

Remedy: “What have you done or tried in the past to control your weight?” “What is the most successful approach you tried to lose weight?” “What do you attribute the weight loss to?” “What caused you to gain your weight back?”

Setting: “What was going on in your life when you last felt in control of your weight?” “What was going on when you gained your weight?” “What role has stress played in your weight gain?” “How important is social support or having a buddy to help you?”

Temporal pattern: “What is the pattern of your weight gain?” “Did you gradually gain your weight over time, or is it more cyclic (yo-yo)?” “Are there large swings in your weight, and if so, what is the weight change?”

As Kushner notes,

“These features provide a contextual understanding of how and when patients gained weight, what efforts were employed to take control, and the impact of body weight on their health. Furthermore, by using a narrative or autobiographical approach to obtaining the weight history, patients are able to express, in their own words, a life course perspective of the underlying burden, frustration, struggle, stigma or shame associated with trying to manage body weight. Listening should be unconditional and nonjudgmental. By letting patients tell their story, the clinician is also able to assess the patients’ awareness, knowledge, motivation, decision-making, and resiliency regarding weight management. The narrative provides a basis for approaching the patients’ weight holistically, as well as beginning to formulate diagnostic and therapeutic options.”

There is no doubt much to be gained in understanding obesity by allowing patients to tell their own weight stories.

@DrSharma
Berlin, D

 

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Free Webinar: Assessing Body Fat – Taking Obesity Phenotyping To The Next Level

As readers will be well aware, n terms of health risks, fat is not fat is not fat is not fat.

Rather, whether or not body fat affects health depends very much on the type of body fat and its location.

While there have been ample attempts at trying to describe body fat distribution with simple anthropometric tools like measuring tapes and callipers, these rather crude and antiquated approaches have never established themselves in clinical practice simply because they are cumbersome, inaccurate, and fail to reliably capture the exact anatomical location of body fat. Furthermore, they provide no insights into ectopic fat deposition – i.e. the amount of fat in organs like liver or muscle, a key determinant of metabolic disease.

Recent advances in imaging technology together with sophisticated image recognition now offers a much more compelling insight into fat phenotype.

In this regard, readers may be interested in a live webinar that will be hosted by the Canadian Obesity Network at 12.00 pm Eastern Standard Time on Thu, Nov 23, 2017. The webinar provides an overview of a new technology developed by the Swedish company AMRA,  that may have both important research and clinical applications.

The talk features Olof Dahlqvist Leinhard, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer & Co-Founder at AMRA and Ian Neeland, MD, a general cardiologist with special expertise in obesity and cardiovascular disease, as well as noninvasive imaging at the UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, US.

Registration for this seminar is free but seats are limited.

To join the live event register here.

I have recently heard this talk and can only recommend it to anyone interested in obesity research or management.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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Weight Change (Not Weight!) Is A Vital Sign

Why do doctors weigh people? Because, very early in medical school, we are taught that body weight is an important indicator of health.

While one may certainly argue about the value of a single weight measurement at any point in time (especially in adults), there is simply no denying that weight trajectories (changes in body weight – up or down) can provide important (often vital) clinical information.

Let’s begin with the easiest (and least arguable) situations of all – unintentional weight loss.

Among all clinical parameters one could possibly measure, perhaps non should be as alarming as someone losing weight without actively trying. In almost every single instance of “unintentional” weight loss, the underlying problem needs to be found, and more often than not, the diagnosis is probably serious (cancer is just one possibility).

As with any serious condition, the earlier you detect it, the sooner you can do something about it, therefore, the more often you weight someone, the more likely you will detect early “non-intentional” weight loss.

The contrary situation (un-intentional weight gain) is as important. When someone is gaining weight for no good reason, one needs to look for the underlying cause, which can include everything from an endocrine problem to heart failure.

On the other hand, weight stability, is generally a sign that things are probably “under control”, as they should be when energy homeostasis works fine and people are in energy balance.

Perhaps my own obsession with weighing people comes from my work in nephrology, where we obsess about people’s “dry weight” and use weight as a general means to monitor fluid status. The same is true for working with patients who have heart failure.

Note for all of the above, that while a single (random) weight measurement tells you very little (almost nothing) about anybody’s health status, unexplained changes in body weight are one of the most useful and important clinical signs in all of medicine. Obviously, to plot a trajectory, one has to start somewhere, which means that every patient needs to have a “baseline” body weight recorded somewhere in their chart. While this value may not provide any valuable information, the next one may.

This is why every single patient needs to be weighed at least once in a clinical setting.

As you will imagine, both the context and interpretation of serial weight measurements becomes most challenging in the setting of obesity management.

For one, there is no greater challenge than to suspect underlying “un-intentional” weight loss in someone who is actively trying to lose weight. When “suddenly” a weight loss strategy that was providing modest results “starts working” – all alarm bells should go off. Also, if weight loss is much better than “predicted” it is time to take a serious second look at what’s happening. Furthermore, you need to watch out for patients who are doing far better than expected (even after bariatric surgery) – it takes a keen clinical  mind to watch out for weight loss that appears “too good to be true” (even if the patient is delighted to see the pounds drop off).

Also, in the obesity management setting, weight stability is an important clinical indicator. In someone at their maximum weight, it tells me that the patient is not actively gaining weight, which by definition means that the patient is in caloric balance – remember, the first sign of “success” in obesity management is when the patient stops gaining weight.

In someone, who has already lost weight (in the context of obesity management), weight stability means that the patient’s efforts are continuing (here weight stability is a means to monitor “control”) – weight regain means that the patient may have to re-engage in weight control efforts or (more often) that something has come up in that person’s life that is “sabotaging” their efforts and may need to be identified and addressed (e.g. lost a job, change in medication, depression, etc.). Again, the earlier you identify a “relapse”, the earlier you can intervene.

Finally, in someone attending an obesity clinic, who continues gaining weight, you can be sure that the underlying cause of weight gain has not yet been fully identified or addressed. In other words, the disease is not “controlled” and continues to “progress”.

Thus, patients must be aware, that asking not to be weighed (usually out of shame or embarrassment) derives their clinician of important and possibly “vital” information about their health status.

Again, while a single weight (or BMI) says very little about a patient’s health, changes in body weight (up or down) is a vital sign that should prompt further clinical investigation and possibly intervention.

None of this has anything to do with the fact that people can very well be healthy over a wide range of body shapes and sizes.

It also does not mean that we should take a “weight-centric” approach to obesity management – all of the usual HAES arguments remain valid, even when you regularly ask your patient to step on the scale.

Recording a weight trajectory should be no more “judgemental” than recording a fever chart in a patient with an infection – everything lies in the context and interpretation of the data.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB.

 

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What Do Health Professionals Need To Know About Obesity?

Achieving and maintaining competencies is an ongoing challenge for all health professionals. But in an area like obesity, where most will have received rather rudimentary training (if any), most health professionals will likely be starting from scratch.

So what exactly must you expect of a health professional involved in the care of individuals living with obesity.

This is the subject of a white paper on “Provider Competencies for the Prevention and Management of Obesity“, developed with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

The panel of authors led by Don Bradley (Duke) and William Dietz (George Washington) included representatives from over 20 national (US) professional organisations.

The competencies expected cover the following 10 topics:

Competencies for Core Obesity Knowledge
1.0 Demonstrate a working knowledge of obesity as a disease

2.0 Demonstrate a working knowledge of the epidemiology of the obesity epidemic

3.0 Describe the disparate burden of obesity and approaches to mitigate it

Competencies for Interprofessional Obesity Care
4.0 Describe the benefits of working interprofessionally to address obesity to achieve results that cannot be achieved by a single health professional

5.0 Apply the skills necessary for effective interprofessional collaboration and integration of clinical and community care for obesity

Competencies for Patient Interactions Related to Obesity
6.0 Use patient-centered communication when working with individuals with obesity and others

7.0 Employ strategies to minimize bias towards and discrimination against people with obesity, including weight, body habitus, and the causes of obesity

8.0 Implement a range of accommodations and safety measures specific to people with obesity

9.0 Utilize evidence-based care/services for people with obesity or at risk for obesity

10.0 Provide evidence-based care/services for people with obesity comorbidities

Some of the topics include further subtopics that are deemed especially relevant.

Thus, for e.g., topic 6.o, regarding communication, includes the following sub-competencies:

6.1 Discuss obesity in a non-judgmental manner using person-first language in all communications

6.2 Incorporate the environmental, social, emotional, and cultural context of obesity into conversations with people with obesity

6.3 Use person- and family-centered communication (e.g., using active listening, empathy, autonomy support/shared decision making) to engage the patient and others

Similarly, topic 7.0, regarding the issue of weight bias and discrimination, includes the following sub-competencies:

7.1 Describe the ways in which weight bias and stigma impact health and wellbeing

7.2 Recognize and mitigate personal biases

7.3 Recognize and mitigate the weight biases of others

This is clearly a forward-thinking outline of competencies that we will hopefully come to expect of most health professionals, given that virtually every health professional, no matter their specialty or scope of practice, will likely be called upon to care for people living with obesity.

The full document can be downloaded here.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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