Thursday, August 28, 2014

Call For Abstracts: Canadian Obesity Summit, Toronto, April 28-May 2, 2015

COS2015 toronto callBuilding on the resounding success of Kananaskis, Montreal and Vancouver, the biennial Canadian Obesity Summit is now setting its sights on Toronto.

If you have a professional interest in obesity, it’s your #1 destination for learning, sharing and networking with experts from across Canada around the world.

In 2015, the Canadian Obesity Network (CON-RCO) and the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons (CABPS) are combining resources to hold their scientific meetings under one roof.

The 4th Canadian Obesity Summit (#COS2015) will provide the latest information on obesity research, prevention and management to scientists, health care practitioners, policy makers, partner organizations and industry stakeholders working to reduce the social, mental and physical burden of obesity on Canadians.

The COS 2015 program will include plenary presentations, original scientific oral and poster presentations, interactive workshops and a large exhibit hall. Most importantly, COS 2015 will provide ample opportunity for networking and knowledge exchange for anyone with a professional interest in this field.

Abstract submission is now open – click here

Key Dates

  • Abstract submission deadline: October 23, 2014
  • Notification of abstract review: January 8, 2014
  • Early registration deadline: March 5, 2015

For exhibitor and sponsorship information – click here

To join the Canadian Obesity Network – click here

I look forward to seeing you in Toronto next year!

@DrSharma
Montreal, QC

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Thursday, July 31, 2014

Low Adipocyte Formation Is Associated With Abdominal Obesity

sharma-obesity-adipocytes3One of the key concepts about the deposition of visceral and ectopic fat is the inability of “healthy” subcutaneous to readily expand to accommodate excess calories. This is why people with large fat cells and those with less or no subcutaneous fat (as in partial or complete lipodystrophy) display features of the metabolic syndrome.

In line with these observations, a study by Andre Tchernof and colleagues from the University of Laval, Quebec, in a paper published in ADIPOCYTE show that low adipogenic capacity of subcutaneous adipose tissue is associated with visceral obesity, visceral adipocyte hypertrophy, and a dysmetabolic state.

The researchers studied adipocytes and preadipocytes isolated from subcutaneous and visceral fat samples from 35 women undergoing gynecological surgery and assessed body fat distribution by CT as well as fasting plasma lipids and glycemia.

Using an in vitro differentiation assay, they found that lower adipogenic rates were strongly associated with increased visceral cell size and dyslipidemia.

In addition, When matched for BMI, women with low subcutaneous preadipocyte adipogenic rates had a higher visceral adipose tissue area, omental adipocyte hypertrophy, higher VLDL-lipid content and higher fasting glycemia.

All of these findings are in line with the notion that low subcutaneous preadipocyte differentiation capacity in vitro is associated with visceral obesity, visceral adipocyte hypertrophy, and a dysmetabolic state.

Once again, as regular readers should be aware, not all fat is equal.

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

ResearchBlogging.orgLessard J, Laforest S, Pelletier M, Leboeuf M, Blackburn L, & Tchernof A (2014). Low abdominal subcutaneous preadipocyte adipogenesis is associated with visceral obesity, visceral adipocyte hypertrophy, and a dysmetabolic state. Adipocyte, 3 (3), 197-205 PMID: 25068086

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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

5th Conference on Childhood and Adolescent Obesity, Winnipeg, Sept 23-26, 2014

Jonathan McGavock, PhD, Assoc. Professor, Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, MB

Jonathan McGavock, PhD, Assoc. Professor, Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, MB

For readers interested in the prevention and management of childhood and adolescent obesity, there is still time to submit your abstract (deadline Aug 5) and to register for this event in Winnipeg.

Those of you, who have been to previous meetings in this series, will know that this meeting (interspersed biennially with the Canadian Obesity Summit) brings together clinicians, researchers, policy makers and other stakeholders for 4 days of intense networking and knowledge exchange.

This year’s conference is being organised by Jon McGavock from the Manitoba Institute of Child Health and is sure to be a blast.

Given Jon’s interest in this area, this year’s conference will include a strong focus on the burden of obesity among Indigenous Youth and showcase examples of the best and promising practices within Indigenous communities across Canada and the US.

This special theme will include presentations from Indigenous youth living in communities with a high burden of obesity, sharing circles with Indigenous leaders and stakeholders and will explore interventions designed to promote these strengths and enhance resiliency among children and adolescents.

Of course, the conference will also cover a wide range of other topics related to childhood obesity across the age and care continuum.

View CE Credits HERE.

Brochure is available HERE.

Register for the conference HERE.

Registration for the pre-conference only HERE.

Submit your abstract HERE.

Incidentally, I will be having the privilege of giving a keynote at the opening of the pre-conference.

While in Winnipeg, I will also be performing my “Stop Being a Yo-Yo” show at the Colin Jackson Studio Theatre on Sept. 24, Show time: 7:00 p.m. (click HERE for online tickets).

See you in Winnipeg!

@DrSharma
Edmonton, AB

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Friday, June 27, 2014

Canadians Embark on Landmark Study on Managing Childhood Obesity

sharma-obesity-kids-scale2In line with  global trends, there is considerable concern in Canada on the rising prevalence of childhood obesity.

While much work continues to focus on preventing childhood obesity, far less is known about managing it.

Now, a virtual who-is-who of pediatric obesity researchers and clinicians from across Canada have embarked on a creating the CANadian Pediatric Weight Management Registry (CANPWR), the protocol of which appears in BMC Pediatrics.

CANPWR has three primary aims:

1. To document changes in anthropometric, lifestyle, behavioural, and obesity-related co-morbidities in children enrolled in Canadian pediatric weight management programs over a three-year period;

2. To characterize the individual-, family-, and program-level determinants of change in anthropometric and obesity-related co-morbidities;

3. To examine the individual-, family-, and program-level determinants of program attrition.

This prospective cohort, multi-centre study will include 1,600 children (2 – 17 years old with a BMI >=85th percentile) enrolled in eight Canadian pediatric weight management centres.

Data collection will occur at presentation and 6-, 12-, 24-, and 36-months follow-up.

Although the primary study outcomes are BMI z-score and change in BMI z-score over time a number of secondary outcomes including other anthropometric (e.g., height, waist circumference,), cardiometabolic (e.g., blood pressure, lipid profile, glycemia), lifestyle (e.g., dietary intake, physical activity, sedentary activity), and psychosocial (e.g., health-related quality of life) variables will also be assessed.

The researchers will also examine potential determinants of change and program attrition including individual-, family-, and program-level variables.

I am certain that the findings will be of considerable interest not just in terms of helping us better understand exactly how childhood obesity is being effectively managed in Canada (or not) but also provide important insights for planning future obesity management services for kids with overweight and obesity.

@DrSharma
Vancouver, BC

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Friday, June 20, 2014

Your Body Thinks Obesity Is A Disease

sharma-obesity-adipose-tissue-macrophageYesterday, the 4th National Obesity Student Summit (#COSM2014) featured a debate on the issue of whether or not obesity should be considered a disease.

Personally, I am not a friend of such “debates”, as the proponents are forced to take rather one-sided positions that may not reflect their own more balanced and nuanced opinions.

Nevertheless, the four participants in this “structured” debate, Drs. Sharon Kirkpatrick and Samantha Meyer on the “con” team and Drs. John Mielke and Russell Tupling on the “pro” team (all from the University of Waterloo) valiantly defended their assigned positions.

While the arguments on the “con” side suggested that “medicalising” obesity would detract attention from a greater focus prevention while cementing the status quo and feeding into the arms of the medical-industrial complex, the “pro” side argued for better access to treatments (which should not hinder efforts at prevention).

But a most interesting view on this was presented by Tupling, who suggested that we only have to look as far as the body’s own response to excess body fat (specifically visceral fat) to determine whether or not obesity is a disease.

As he pointed out, the body’s own immunological pro-inflammatory response to excess body fat, a generic biological response that the body uses to deal with other “diseases” (whether acute or chronic) should establish that the body clearly views this condition as a disease.

Of course, as readers are well aware, this may not always be the case – in fact, the state of “healthy obesity” is characterized by this lack of immunological response both locally within the fat tissue as well as systemically.

Obviously, it will be of interest to figure out why some bodies respond to obesity as a disease and others don’t – but from this perspective, the vast majority of people with excess weight are in a “diseased” state – at least if you asked their bodies.

While this is a very biological argument for the case – it is indeed a very insightful one: it is not the existence of excess body fat that defines the “disease” rather, how the body responds to this “excess” is what makes you sick.

As readers, are well aware, there are several other arguments (including ethical and utilitarian considerations) that favour the growing consensus on viewing obesity as a disease.

Of course,  calling obesity a disease should not detract us from prevention efforts, but, as I often point out, just because be treat diabetes or cancer as diseases, does not mean that we do not make efforts to prevent them.

If calling obesity a disease increases resources towards better dealing with this problem and helps take away some of the shame and blame – so be it.

@DrSharma
Waterloo, Ontario

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In The News

Diabetics in most need of bariatric surgery, university study finds

Oct. 18, 2013 – Ottawa Citizen: "Encouraging more men to consider bariatric surgery is also important, since it's the best treatment and can stop diabetic patients from needing insulin, said Dr. Arya Sharma, chair in obesity research and management at the University of Alberta." Read article

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