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Mapping Pediatric Weight Management Programs in Manitoba.



Kristy_Wittmeier

Kristy Wittmeier, PhD, Director of Knowledge Translation at the Manitoba Centre for Healthcare Innovation, Winnipeg

Today’s guest post comes from Kristy Wittmeier, PhD (and CON Bootcamper), a physiotherapist at the Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre and Director of Knowledge Translation at the Manitoba Centre for Healthcare Innovation. She has a special interest in physical activity as a tool to prevent and manage obesity-related conditions in youth. Her current positions and affiliation with the Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba allow her to combine research and practice to improve patient outcomes. Twitter: @KristyWittmeier

If you were trying to build a coordinated provincial strategy to promote healthy weight in children and youth, where would you start? This has been a question on the minds of a team of healthcare providers and researchers in Manitoba for some time now.

Manitoba has the highest rate of type 2 diabetes in children in Canada, a condition that is in part related to obesity. In Manitoba, youth are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at a rate 20 times higher than in any other province.

There are well-established, multidisciplinary clinical programs in our province that work with youth living with type 2 diabetes. For example, the Diabetes Education Resource for Children and Adolescents, which has existed since 1985, runs two weekly clinics and an outreach program for youth affected by type 2 diabetes.

Recently, the diabetes care team joined forces with pediatric kidney specialists in the province to provide a combined clinic for youth affected by both type 2 diabetes and kidney complications.

Manitoba is also home to the Maestro Project, which helps teens living with type 2 diabetes navigate what could otherwise be a difficult transition from pediatric to adult health care services and teams.

Similarly, research teams that include community advisors and families are tackling important questions related to the origins of type 2 diabetes and exploring innovative interventions to improve the health and quality of life for kids with this diagnosis.

Members of the DREAM (Diabetes Research Envisioned and Accomplished in Manitoba) Theme at the Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba are studying important biological, social and psychological factors linked with early kidney disease in youth with type 2 diabetes in a study called iCARE (Improving renal Complications in Adolescents with type 2 diabetes through REsearch).

While we have made significant progress in the area of type 2 diabetes care and research, we have made less progress in the areas of prevention and treatment of obesity in children and youth. We are one of the few provinces in Canada without a specialized clinical team dedicated to pediatric obesity. We lack a comprehensive provincial strategy that can link health care providers to each other, or to existing community programs that might help families. Gaps in services can leave families without access to care that could help their children. This is the issue that we have decided to tackle in a study that was recently funded by the Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba.

Our study is called “Mapping the state of pediatric weight management programs in Manitoba.” We will start with a survey within Manitoba, to identify existing programs that are available to families affected by obesity in our province. We want to know what is currently available. Where can health care providers refer families? And importantly, what resources are missing in our province to be able to provide an evidence-based approach to pediatric weight management?

While the title suggests we are solely focused on Manitoba, we are in fact looking to shape our provinces’ approach by learning from others across Canada and the United States.

To do this, the second part of the study will involve updating a 2010 study that mapped Canadian pediatric weight management programs to understand what has changed on the national landscape. What new programs exist and where? What programs are no longer offered and why?

Then we will move on to more in-depth conversations with members of the eight clinics involved in the Canadian Pediatric Weight Management Registry (CANPWR), and an additional eight clinics in the United States to better understand how their approaches evolved, barriers and successes that they have experienced and other key learnings that they can share to help inform a Manitoba approach.

Once we have brought the information from these activities together, we will hold a meeting for families, community members, clinicians, researchers, healthy living organizations and policy makers in the province. We will look at the data together and prioritize the next important steps on this journey.

We all need to work together to build healthier families, healthier communities and healthier populations. This novel approach that integrates the experiences and priorities of others will ensure that when we launch a new direction for pediatric obesity management in Manitoba, it will be relevant and targeted to everyone’s needs.

1 Comment

  1. Thanks Arya for helping us get the news out about our project. Our research team includes Dr’s Geert ‘tJong, Geoff Ball, Kate Sibley and Roberta Woodgate. We look forward to collaborations with pediatric endocrinologists in MB; Dr’s Elizabeth Sellers and Brandy Wicklow, as well as collaborations with CON, Dr. Katherine Morrison and CANPWR, our local DREAM research team and advisory group at CHRIM and everyone else who will be involved along the way!

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